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E-Culture Survey Methodology
 

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E-Culture Survey Methodology
All e-culture survey responses were received and analyzed by Rosabeth Moss Kanter's E-culture project team at Harvard Business School. Of the 785 responses, approximately 300 were submitted through the Harvard Business School Web site.

Almost all respondents hailed from the ranks of top management (CEO/president, senior executive, or board member). Approximately 72% of respondents -- and 81% of respondents from companies with fewer than 100 employees -- described their companies as heavily involved with the Web and said that Internet strategy is among their responsibilities.

This was not a random sample; it consisted of interested volunteers. Consequently, statistics and conclusions are only suggestive.

The bulk of respondents were either from small and emerging companies that are part of the Inc. 500 or the Young Entrepreneurs' Organization, or from large global corporations belonging to the World Economic Forum. The respondents included 247 publicly traded corporations; 479 closely held corporations, professional partnerships, or joint ventures; and 51 government or nonprofit organizations. Slightly more than half of the respondents were from companies founded in the last 20 years.

There were 519 responses from organizations headquartered in North America, 160 from Europe, 22 from Asia, 16 from Latin America, and 68 that we classified as "other" because information was missing from their surveys. (We suspect that a fair number of those were U.S. companies.)

There were 308 responses from purely domestic companies (producing in one country for use in that country); 185 from exporters (producing in one country for international use); 19 from offshore producers (producing internationally for use in one country); and 252 from companies that are international in both production and markets.

110 respondents identified their organizations as pure Internet operations -- either dot-coms or e-commerce units within established brick-and-mortar companies; 657 were not pure Internet operations. Industries included retail, financial services, software, technical support, manufacturing, publishing, and entertainment.

Copyright © 2001 Rosabeth Moss Kanter

Evolve!: Succeeding in the Digital Culture of Tomorrow by Rosabeth Moss Kanter is the book that grew out of the E-culture survey.

Related resources:
You Are Here
Comments from the E-Culture Survey
Are You Ready to Lead the E-Cultural Revolution?

Last updated: Jan 21, 2001




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