MARKETING

Fake Jobs Convert Real Members

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Would you make a good Superhero? How about a cushy White House job as a "Pronunciation Strategery Specialist"? If these jobs sound too bizarre to be true, they are. Both were actual listings in Headhunter.net's Hidden Job promotion, a viral marketing campaign designed to increase awareness of the online recruiting agency and draw new members.

Headhunter buried a wacky dream job among thousands of legitimate listings. Members who found it could "apply for the job" and register to win a $300 Amazon gift certificate. The program, only in its third month, has proven a viral marketing hit with both job seekers and recruiters.

Launched in April with the Superhero job, the contest drew 188,496 searches and 290,453 clicks. A whopping 67,982 expressed interest in the Superhero gig. Partly because job seekers were required to become members to enter the contest, 11,243 Headhunter visitors logged in for the first time. Apparently, even disgruntled employees scouring job boards need a little diversion now and again. On the employer side, 106 new recruiters and 95 hiring managers left their digital calling cards.

Nearly 9,000 job seekers applied for May's "Pronunciation Strategery Specialist" listing. Headhunter also collected 40 unique business leads and picked up 3,200 new registrations to their job seeker service. Not bad for free publicity.

And despite zero advertising, Roll Call's "Heard on the Hill" section--the Congressional equivalent of The Jacobyte--picked up on the fun, running a story on the "Strategery Specialist" listing. Sen. Tom Daschele and friends must have chuckled at the plea for "someone who can teach our client to say big words" and job qualifications including a love of "towel-snapping frat-boy humor" and "special knowledge of Texas history (just the good parts, thank you!)."

Interaction with the Headhunter.net brand exceeded expectations. Headhunter.net Web Evangelist Jennifer Badeaux tells ICONOCAST that some members have really been swept up in the fun, going so far as creating humorous resumes and sending them to customer service. And despite all the clues, there were still a few job seekers who thought the jobs were real. For those brave souls, ICONOCAST has a dream job: Seagull Manager. Hurry, applications are still being accepted.

Copyright © 2001 ICONOCAST Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Last updated: Jun 15, 2001




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