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HARDWARE

How can I increase my hard drive space without sacrificing speed?

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Offices & Operations mentor Mie-Yun Lee responds to the following question from an inc.com user:

Each month I delete old files from my hard drive, but I still don't have enough space. Is there any way to get more space without buying a new system, and without sacrificing speed?

Mie-Yun Lee's response:

It's not easy for me to throw out anything, including my old computer files, so I know how easy it is to use up space on a hard drive. But there's no need to shell out all that cash for a new computer system if more space is all you need. Buying an additional hard drive will do the trick.

When choosing a hard drive, size, performance, and compatibility with your system are usually the deciding factors. Sounds like speed is a priority with you, so look into getting a Small Computer System Interface (SCSI) hard drive. This will make saving files and opening programs quick (some systems don't support SCSI drives so you may have to buy a SCSI card, which will cost $50 to a couple hundred dollars). Choosing a drive with a minimum rotational speed of 7,200 revolutions per minute and an access time of fewer than 10 milliseconds will allow quick disk scanning when you search for data.

As far as space goes, you'll want at least 10 gigabytes (GB) of space, preferably partitioned to maximize management of your files. In the end you'll end up paying $200 to $300 -- a pretty good price tag compared to buying a whole new system. To get a free quote for computer storage, try www.buyerzone.com.

Copyright © 2001 inc.com LLC

Last updated: Jul 3, 2001




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