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Reid Hoffman on Dealing With Disruption Whiplash

The co-founder of LinkedIn explains why entrepreneurs should embrace opposition--not shy away from it.
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Disrupting a market almost always involves some sort of backlash from incumbent businesses.

For LinkedIn co-founder Reid Hoffman (above, left), persevering in the face of such resistance is a requirement of being a disruptor.   

During a conversation with Inc. president and editor-in-chief Eric Schurenberg, Hoffman shared his belief that entrepreneurs should expect pressure from proponents of the "established" way of doing things.

"There is some whiplash just from the amount of change and things that are happening. That always happens from an accelerating technological environment and accelerating globalization," Hoffman says. "You want to say, 'How should the world really be and what's the way that we should all be living in it?'"

For example, businesses such as Airbnb have faced resistance from hotels for disrupting the hospitality industry, but that doesn't mean there's something wrong with the company's model, according to Hoffman.

"We've allowed people to rent a room...facilitating them being able to rent a room, even for a weekend, is actually a good thing," he says.

"The question is: how do we make this good for the city and neighbors? Will it change the dynamics of the hotel industry some? Sure, but having a suite of different options that consumers can choose between is a good thing."

To hear more about dealing with disruption whiplash, watch the video below.

 

Reid Hoffman's Surprising (and Highly Effective) Hiring Strategy

LinkedIn co-founder Reid Hoffman talks to Inc.'s Eric Schurenberg about his unique hiring strategy, networking best practices for entrepreneurs, and his new book “The Alliance: Managing Talent in the Networked Age.”

 
Last updated: Jul 23, 2014

GRAHAM WINFREY

Graham Winfrey is a staff writer for Inc.com. He previously covered alternative investments at Private Equity International magazine, prior to which he worked at Business Insider and msnbc.com. He lives in Brooklyn, New York.




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