1. The Gender-Funding Gap

Building a venture-backed company when you're a woman is a tough road: A recent Harvard study found that even when the pitches are identical, investors choose male-led startups 68 percent of the time. But there are workarounds to the problem, according to a number of entrepreneurs interviewed in Newsweek: Give investors a reason to personally connect with your product, and consider crowdfunding.--Newsweek

2. A Company Without a CEO

Google has acquired Stackdriver (terms undisclosed), a Boston-based cloud-software startup with 30 employees, $15 million in funding--and no CEO. Co-founders Izzy Azeri and Dan Belcher say have no formal titles. Half of the employees report to Azeri and the other half to Belcher, and those employees don't have titles, either. The unusual management structure has "allowed us to go fast," Azeri says. "There's not just one person responsible for the whole company, and that alleviates pressure." It's worth keeping in mind, if your startup's top team is haggling over titles.--The Boston Globe

3. Web Entrepreneurs, Beware

The end of Net neutrality rules is already taking a toll on startups. Venture capitalists such as Union Square Ventures partner Brad Burnham are now saying they plan to stay away from funding companies in mobile payments, media, and other industries whose businesses rely on fast Internet connections.--MIT Technology Review

4. The Truth About Employee Benefits

Employees are fed up with--and maybe giving up on--their health insurance. A new survey finds only 59 percent are satisfied with their health care coverage, compared with 70 percent just three years ago. Some 62 percent of workers said they would pay more to get guaranteed retirement benefits, but only 32 percent were willing to pay up for stability in health care costs.--The Washington Post

5. How to Lose Friends and Alienate Municipalities

A new San Francisco startup is encouraging drivers to auction off their primo parking spots to other drivers--and promoting the idea that individuals with cars can make a living off of sitting in (rare) parking spots downtown. Drivers are furious and are taking to Twitter to rant about MonkeyParking's attempt to profit off of public streets.--SF Weekly

6. Networking Tip

Evernote released an update to its iPhone app Wednesday that allows for better scanning of business cards and a more streamlined interaction with LinkedIn. The two companies announced late last year that they would team up to take the here's-my-business-card transaction mobile and digital, and it looks as if this update might be the first step.--VentureBeat

7. Another Bitcoin Warning

The Securities and Exchange Commission warned investors against dealing with Bitcoin, saying that the currency is unregulated and virtually untraceable in case of fraud. But PandoDaily argues that the statement ignores one of the most severe threats: the ability of the government to seize and liquidate Bitcoin before successfully convicting someone of wrongdoing, which was demonstrated during the shutdown of the Silk Road marketplace.--PandoDaily