Video Transcript

00:09 Kevin Ryan: The other element on that is benchmarking. This is the trickiest part because when I ask people, "Is your CTO good?" And people have a tendency to respond to that the way that the country responds to their congressmen. If you know the surveys, everyone feels like their own congressman is pretty good, it's just all those other congressmen that are really bad. And that's 'cause they don't really know how to compare their congressman to some other congressmen. And the same thing is true of all of us in a company. So the debate is not whether your CTO is sort of much more technical than everyone else in the management team, 'cause yes, that's like asking, "Is the pitcher on your baseball team a much better pitcher than all the outfielders?" Yes, he is. That's not the question. The question is, "Is he a better pitcher than all the other pitchers out there?"

00:57 Ryan: And so, the tough part that you've got to really push yourself on is, your 10 competitors out there, "Is your CFO better? Do you think he would really be in the top two? He or she?" That's a tougher question. And it ripples down, that group is so important. I think that... And I'm sure everyone here would agree and it's again, a little bit of a platitude, but the great people in your company are underpaid and you need to make sure that you can skew that and make sure you take care of those people because it ripples down. And people say something that is deceptive and I think not quite true which is that, there's a saying that A-level people hire A-level people and B-level people hire C-level people. And I actually think that the result is the same, but it's not that. What it really is, is that, A-level people wanna work for A-level people and the C-level people in there end up only... The B-level people who are hiring can only get C-level people because why...

01:59 Ryan: When you... Think of the jobs you've taken in the past, one of the key elements is, who you're gonna work for? And how many times did you take a job where you thought, "You know what? Yeah, I was offered this job by this big guy Fred and he really didn't seem all that smart or all that impressive. I didn't like him all that much. But I'm real excited. I mean, I'm gonna take that job." It doesn't happen. It just doesn't happen. And secondly, by the way, the conclusion that for 10 years at DoubleClick when we did exit surveys of people leaving and we had times where we had people leaving... When you do your seventh round of layoffs, morale goes down a little bit, oddly enough. And so, it was a tough time and more and more people were going out of business, it was really... It was very difficult.

02:46 Ryan: Why did people leave and why did a lot of people stay, the vast majority? It was all about their manager. People will put up with a tremendous amount of unrest, of the business not going that well, missing budgets, things like that, if they wake up everyday and think, "You know what? I like my manager, he or she supports me and I'm learning from that person." They'll go through a lot. And so, the number one responsibility, when I go to these managers and I say, "Look, you know what? If people are leaving your group, that is your responsibility. It's not their problem, it's your problem." And I want all of our senior execs to be focused on that all the time. There is nothing... I work in an incredibly competitive space. Everyone can another job elsewhere. I know every single day, the guilt...