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DATA DETECTIVES

The Cities Where People Get the Most (and Least) Sleep

Jawbone analyzed thousands of its customers' sleeping habits, and the results reveal a lot about how people work and play according to where they live.
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Turns out, when you get thousands of people to wear activity-tracking wristbands 24/7, you find out a lot of information about how they spend their days.

Jawbone recently released analyzed aggregated sleep data collected via its UP wristbands by city, painting more than just a picture of when people go to bed and wake up.

For example, a visualization of New Yorkers' habits indicate that the "work hard, play hard" mentality is alive and well in the city. Additionally, the data shows that Spaniards haven't abandoned the afternoon siesta tradition in Madrid.

In a post on Jawbone's blog, company data scientist Brian Wilt said that the results are based on data from tens of thousands of users per U.S. city studied. And international cities included a sample of more than 5,000 users.

The results show that the city that's earliest to bed is also earliest to rise. That is Brisbane, Australia, where citizens go to bed at 10:57 pm and wake up at 6:29 am. Likewise, Moscow goes to sleep the latest--at 12:46 am--and wakes up the latest--at 8:08 am. Meanwhile, UP users in Tokyo seem sleep-deprived by Americans' standards, as they average only 5 hours and 46 minutes of sleep each night.

Here are three other cities Jawbone highlighted in its sleep visualization chart: 

New York

A snapshot of a typical Monday night in New York reveals that the city that never sleeps actually goes to bed pretty early in comparison to other metropolises like Madrid, Dubai, and Tokyo. However, when the weekend rolls around, the data clearly show that sleep is the last thing on New Yorkers' minds, and they're up to all hours of the night.

Beijing

Europeans aren't the only ones who are fond of siestas. "In Beijing, it's culturally acceptable to take a nap in the afternoon at work, and you can see that roughly 5 percent of UP wearers do so," Wilt said. 

Dubai

Dubai is a somewhat sleepy city in the mornings. Roughly 10 percent of users are still in bed by 11 am. Data from that city also shows the impact that Ramadan has on residents' habits, many of whom postpone sleep in order to eat after fasting.

If you're interested in viewing sleep data from your own neighborhood, head over to Jawbone's blog where there are sleep visualizations for dozens more cities. 

Last updated: Aug 21, 2014

LAURA MONTINI | Staff Writer

Laura Montini is a reporter at Inc. She previously covered health care technology for Health 2.0 News and has served as an associate editor at The Health Care Blog. She lives in San Francisco.




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