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MARKETING

You Get What You Pay For

An organizer of seminars realizes that people value information more if they have to pay for it.
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JANUARY 1990

You have some great in-formation that you want to give your customers or prospects. The experts are lined up, and you've gotten people to donate their time or induced corporate sponsors to pick up the tab so you won't have to charge anything for the seminar you've planned. What's your next step?

Figure out how much you are going to charge. "Unless you charge people something, they're not going to value the information," says Robert F. Donovan, director of marketing for Equimark Corp., in Pittsburgh. Two of its subsidiary banks had put together a string of seminars on marketing and finance featuring professors from The Wharton School and the University of Pittsburgh and, to attract new banking customers, had planned to offer them for free. "People were reluctant to come to the seminars if they were free. Unless it hurt a little bit financially, they didn't think they had value."

After testing various prices, Equimark settled on $25 per session. Attendance exceeded expectations.




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