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STRATEGY

Top 10 Celebrity Entrepreneurs

Plenty of well-known people dabble in business. A smaller number are talented businesspeople, the real deal, and these are the best of them. Plus: Moby, Remixed One part pop star, one part tea magnate. The story of an unlikely but very determined entrepreneur.
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Sean Combs

Company

Bad Boy Worldwide (entertainment, marketing, fashion, food)

Quote:

"I hope [people] see that I have a good head on my shoulders," he has said. "I'm not just poppin' Cristal and throwing parties."

Sean Combs's nickname may be P. Diddy, but it should be P. Did It. As in did it all. The Harlem-born kid, who was raised by a single mother after his father was murdered when he was two years old, has grown up to be a $315 million rapper-cum-actor-cum-producer-cum-designer who owns and heads Bad Boy Worldwide, a $300 million conglomerate that includes a record label, a marketing company, and Justin's restaurants in New York City and Atlanta. Not to mention Sean John, his clothing line, which just opened a splashy new boutique on Fifth Avenue and for which he won Best Menswear Designer at the 2004 CFDA awards (the fashion industry's answer to the Oscars).

You'd think that a guy with this much going on couldn't possibly be getting his hands dirty. But Combs doesn't just oversee his $300 million empire, he still gets in the studio to guide the rap stars on his record label, directs his Sean John models on precisely how and when to walk down the runway, and teaches Bad Boy's summer interns himself. And while he gives back to his community through, among other charities, his Daddy's House Social Programs, he's generous not only with the massive dough (he recently donated $1 million to his alma mater, Howard University), but also with his time, running the New York City Marathon last year to raise $4 million for New York City public schools and traveling tirelessly around the country this fall in an effort to convince young people to get out and vote.

Last updated: Dec 1, 2004




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