31. Original Juan Specialty Foods

Revenue growth from 1999 to 2003 803%
Revenue for 2003 3.4 million
Full-time employees in 2003 73

Kansas City, Kansas

Joe Polo's hot sauces, salsas, and mixers can be found on the shelves of upscale specialty food markets and grocery stores. Thanks in part to prize money he won in a contest for entrepreneurs that was sponsored by Visa, Polo recently moved Original Juan into a 60,000-square-foot facility in an area once known for strip joints.

32. Integrated Management Services

Revenue growth from 1999 to 2003 761%
Revenue for 2003 8.5 million
Full-time employees in 2003 46

Jackson, Miss.

This civil-engineering and consulting firm focuses on inner city projects in the South: road design, water-systems improvement, and bridge-building. It's also building bridges within the community: The company runs a center that tutors 250 teens in math and science. In the six years the center has been open, 85% of its graduates have gone on to college.

33. Oakleaf Waste Management

Revenue growth from 1999 to 2003 745%
Revenue for 2003 165.8 million
Full-time employees in 2003 235

East Hartford, Conn.

Oakleaf thinks big, hauling trash for multilocation companies like Pier 1 Imports and the Gap. The customers get one bill, and can manage scheduling via the Internet. The company also runs equipment-leasing, facilities-management, and trash-compacting divisions.

34. Long Wave

Revenue growth from 1999 to 2003 743%
Revenue for 2003 5.5 million
Full-time employees in 2003 70

Oklahoma City

This defense contractor specializes in military communication, from submarines to satellites. CEO Phil Miller just upgraded to a 9,400-square-foot office with a view of the brand-new Triple-A ballpark that is home to the Texas Rangers affiliate.

35. Rego Realty

Revenue growth from 1999 to 2003 717%
Revenue for 2003 5.4 million
Full-time employees in 2003 45

Hartford, Conn.

Jose Reategui, originally from Peru, has refurbished a substantial number of buildings in Hartford, most of them residential. Some 90% of his staff is Latino. Because they come from several different nations, Reategui holds work celebrations all year long: The Colombians mark their national holiday on July 20, the Peruvians on July 28, the Mexicans on September 16, and so on.

36. 1-888-OhioComp

Revenue growth from 1999 to 2003 688%
Revenue for 2003 5.2 million
Full-time employees in 2003 57

Cleveland

1-888-OhioComp manages medical cases for employers and injured workers throughout Ohio's 88 counties. The company is part of a family-run empire: The father of CEO Jay Lucarelli started a staffing company in 1968 and a payroll-processing business with his sons in 1999.

37. MobilityWorks

Revenue growth from 1999 to 2003 628%
Revenue for 2003 22.2 million
Full-time employees in 2003 125

Akron

MobilityWorks modifies and sells vans for elderly and disabled people. Last year, the company sold more than 800 vehicles through 10 retail stores in the Midwest. Akron is a great place to have a factory, says founder Bill Koeblitz, because the city's blue-collar workers "know how to use their hands to make things."

38. Environmental Demolition

Revenue growth from 1999 to 2003 620%
Revenue for 2003 9.8 million
Full-time employees in 2003 120

Denver

Environmental Demolition specializes in asbestos abatement and mold remediation, and prides itself on inventing its own tools to get the job done. Among its creations: a covered conveyor system that moves asbestos-contaminated soil from the ground into trucks without letting toxic fibers fly away.

39. ABNA Engineering

Revenue growth from 1999 to 2003 576%
Revenue for 2003 3.6 million
Full-time employees in 2003 60

St. Louis

ABNA specializes in large municipal engineering projects. Click here to read the full profile.

40. ProActive Business Solutions

Revenue growth from 1999 to 2003 553%
Revenue for 2003 5.8 million
Full-time employees in 2003 99

Oakland

The biggest job to date for this commercial moving company involved the transport and installation of 800 computers over one weekend for Microsoft's Silicon Valley branch. When it came to getting her company into new digs, CEO DeeDee Towery took advantage of Oakland's downtown revitalization program. Her firm was the first tenant to move into the rehabbed 1906 Tribune Tower.