I set out to be an entrepreneur and then an investor. I became a writer almost by accident. Now, I can't imagine not writing--it's something I do daily. It's how I problem solve. And it's crucial to my continued learning and growth.

In the late 1980s, I started my first company, Feld Technologies, which wrote custom software for companies. This was back when personal computers were becoming popular in a business context. But they were complex. Computer salesmen hawked them speaking a language you didn't understand, in a style that could have worked equally well on a used-car lot.

Our clients wanted to understand what they were buying. They didn't care about RAM or CONFIG.SYS settings. So I started writing memos about how the computers and the software they were buying would solve their business problems.

I moved my writing online in the mid-1990s and eventually to my own blog, Feld Thoughts. I had become an angel investor using some of the money I'd made from the sale of Feld Technologies, and those experiences provided plenty of blog fodder. My partner Jason Mendelson and I even churned out a series on venture capital financing. This was during a time when venture funding was in the dumps, and the process was opaque. In about 30 posts, we demystified it. Finally, after almost 20 years of writing, the light bulb went on for me.

I write to think.

Forcing myself to sit down and work through these ideas in a logical sequence for an audience of readers required me to refine my thinking on how I invest in startups. How could I make the financing process more efficient? What's the best way to structure a deal? I learned a lot, both from my writing and my readers' responses.

As a result, my approach to VC deals changed after those posts. I simplified my deal terms. I stopped negotiating over nonsense. I had no patience for long arguments over things that didn't matter.

My thoughts really began to crystallize when I started writing books. In 2010, I co-wrote Do More Faster: Techstars Lessons to Accelerate Your Startup, with Techstars CEO and co-founder David Cohen. During this process, David and I nailed down many of the startup strategies that had been rolling around in our heads. I don't think it's a coincidence that Techstars's growth accelerated, as did the growth of the companies we worked with, after publishing that book.

This is not to say that everyone should write books. But some form of regular writing is one of the best ways to give yourself time for reflection and analysis. It could be any kind of writing. Consider Jeff Bezos's approach to meetings. Whoever runs the meeting writes a memo no longer than six pages about the issue at hand. Then, for the first 15 to 30 minutes of the meeting, the group reads it. The rest of the meeting is spent discussing it. No PowerPoint allowed. Brilliant. (I've long felt that PowerPoint is a terrible substitute for critical thinking.)

As helpful as I find writing daily to be, it doesn't always come easily. I often go through long, dry stretches where my writing is uninspired. I stare at the screen, pecking out a few words hesitantly. This used to frustrate me, but now I realize it's just part of the process. Part of the trick is figuring out your most productive writing conditions; for me, it's early in the morning or late at night, preferably with Pink Floyd, electronic music, or classical piano blaring.

Many people might find a blank screen with its blinking cursor terrifying. Where do I even begin? you might ask. These days, I much prefer staring at that screen to standing up in front of a crowd. I think better, and I learn much more.

Brad Feld is an entrepreneur and the managing director of VC firm Foundry Group in Boulder, Colorado. He co-authored, with Mahendra Ramsinghani, Startup Boards: Getting the Most Out of Your Board of Directors.