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The Dangers of Computing in the Cloud
 

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By now, you've probably heard about the technical glitch that most likely resulted in some T-Mobile Sidekick users permanently losing data such as contact names, phone numbers, and digital photos. It seems that Danger, Microsoft's aptly named cloud-based storage service, failed to properly back-up data, so customers who had removed their batteries from their phones or let their batteries run out may have lost the personal information on their phones forever, according to the New York Times and other news outlets.

The debacle is alarming for two reasons: First, it serves as a warning to people who have become increasingly dependent on their phones for storing contacts, photos, and calendar events, yet don't bother to back up their own data. More alarmingly, it calls into question the increasingly popular concept of storing valuable data, both personal and business-related, in the so-called "cloud."

I, for one, am guilty of not paying much mind to backing up my iPhone, which has now replaced my land line, my digital camera, my old-fashioned planner, and even my laptop. I'm curious to hear about other people's strategies for backing up their phones, as well as your thoughts on the safety of cloud computing in general. Please comment below or email me at nheintz@inc.com if you have any tips or opinions.

Last updated: Oct 13, 2009




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