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The 13 Best New Startup Logos Of The Year

A great logo portrays what the company does in a way that's simple and artistic. These startups nailed it.
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A logo can make or break it for a startup. It's the first thing that catches your eye in the App Store, on Twitter, and on a website. 

When you're just getting off the ground, you need a logo that quickly and creatively portrays what your company does. There's this perfect balance between simple and artistic that will avoid being too corny while demonstrating a meaningful message.

In app download stores logos are crucial for helping new users figure out who you are and what your app does.

The year is still young, but these particular startups have impressed us with their logos, showing a flair for the art.


 

ClaimAir's paper airplane works on two levels: The app is about streamlining airline paperwork.

ClaimAir guides you through the process of getting compensated for flight troubles. You explain the inconveniences you experienced on a flight, and then the app will help you determine your claims and get compensation.

 


 

TizU turns your text message into a ticking bomb.

TizU is trying to put a new, fun spin on the messaging app trend. The idea is that you send a message, but delay it until a certain date so the receiver can see that there is a message for them, but can't read it yet.

 


 

Just in Case's logo consists mostly of negative space.

This unique startup secures your personal information so that if you suddenly pass away your family can access it. Just in Case wants to create your digital legacy.

 


 

Hopefully you won't actually need a magnifying glass for this search.

Roomi will help you find your perfect roommate, letting you chat with potential candidates before committing.

 


 

Cropfection tapped this familiar symbol from photo editing programs.

Cropfection will take your design and turn it into a professional looking website. Perfect for those who don't have a coding background.

 


 

This dog wants to get you a job.

Underdog.io is trying to improve the job search process by matching candidates with employers. Right now it's focusing on the New York startup scene.

 


 

Niche went with a minimalist representation of a person who also doubles as a letter N.

Niche is the platform for the stars of Vine, Instagram, and Twitter. It helps them monetize their followings and fame on social media by connecting them with with brands and marketers.

 


 

This logo for the restaurant app Cover uses a circle--a common app logo shape--as a visual pun for a dinner plate.

Cover is working with restaurants to let guests pay the bill on their own schedule. You just tell them you're paying with Cover and you can pay directly through the app without having to wait for a waiter to bring you a bill, get your credit card, and return it all.

 


 

Blue Apron also went for a more literal logo.

Blue Apron sends customers ingredient kits to cook meals, and each kit contains exactly the right amount of stuff to cook a single meal. Blue Apron measures out how much you need of each ingredient, and all you have to do is put it all together. You get all the pleasure of cooking for yourself and getting it right first time, but without the hassle of going to the grocery store first.

 


 

The Jellyfish "brain" is made up of loose networks, which is supposed to represent the network in Jelly.

Jelly was started by Twitter cofounder Biz Stone and Ben Finkel. It's like Quora, the question-and-answer site, but with pictures--you post a photo, interactive map, or location along with a question and other users give you answers.

 


 

Rdio makes use of the negative space in its logo.

Rdio is an online music streaming site on par with Spotify and Beats. It lets you create your own collections of music or play automated streams. If you look at the blue space inside the white "O" you will notice a music note.

 


 

CluckCluck's logo portrays a mama hen with her chicks.

CluckCluck is an app that helps parents and caregivers communicate. Parents can send caregivers emergency contacts, ask them to pick up errands for them, and pay them directly in the app.

 


 

This fox sure looks like he has a Secret.

Secret is an anonymous gossip and confession-sharing app that has garnered a lot of attention since launching earlier this year. Some of the confessions are raunchy, some narcissistic, and some give interesting behind-the-scenes peeks into the tech industry, often revealing the sexist behavior of tech workers.




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