Everyone knows about Silicon Valley, but what if your idea doesn't fit that mold? Then where?

Just as important as coming up with the next big idea is knowing where to begin building that new company. CareerBuilder and EMSI have created a new interactive map that can help you see which metropolitan areas have the growth and the infrastructure that your future business is going to need.

You can  search by clicking on a metropolitan area and finding out which industries are growing there. For instance, the Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington Minn., metropolitan area has seen 18 percent growth since 2010 in advertising, public Rrelations and similar jobs. An ideal spot for your next great idea in PR.

Or, you can search by industry and see which areas are best for the industry you want to be a part of.

If you're just looking for general growth areas, here are the top 10 metropolitan areas:

1. Salt Lake City, Utah
Added more 62,000 jobs since 2010, up 9% (534 new jobs per 10,000 people)

Originally a farming community, Salt Lake City has grown into an industrial center for the state.  Industries with strong job growth in this metro include electronic shopping and mail order houses (up 43%), software publishing (up 28%), specialized freight trucking (up 23%) and credit intermediation (up 22%).

2. Grand Rapids-Wyoming, Mich.
Added over 39,000 jobs since 2010, up 10% (513 new jobs per 10,000 people)

This manufacturing heavyweight has benefited from the rebound of production jobs after the recession. The metro saw job increases in various manufacturing segments such as plastics products (up 35%), motor vehicle parts (up 33%), metalworking machinery (up 30%) and office furniture (up 12%).  Hospitals also accounted for an upswing in jobs (up 16%).

3. San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, Calif.
Added over 91,000 jobs since 2010, up 10% (498 new jobs per 10,000 people)

It's no surprise that software publishing (up 30%), computer systems design (up 19%), data processing and hosting (up 16%), computer manufacturing (up 12%) and scientific research (up 9%) are big contributors to employment for this Silicon Valley metro.

4.  Austin-Round Rock- San Marcos, Tex.
Added over 90,000 jobs since 2010, up 11% (488 new jobs per 10,000 people)

Austin has made a name for itself as a technology and business hub, fueling job growth in management, scientific and consulting services (up 35%), computer systems design (up 35%), data processing and hosting (up 35%) and semiconductor manufacturing (up 17%).

5. Houston-Sugar Land-Baytown, Tex.
Added over 281,000 jobs since 2010, up 10%  (451 new jobs per 10,000 people)

Energy-rich Houston continues to see job growth in utility system construction (specifically, oil and gas pipeline, up 45%), mining support (up 38%), metal and mineral wholesalers (up 31%), oil and gas extraction (up 25%), and architectural and engineering services (21%).

6. Nashville-Davidson-Murfreesboro-Franklin, Tenn.
Added over 71,000 jobs since 2010, up 9% (432 new jobs per 10,000 people)

A popular music center, Nashville saw a 25% increase in jobs for independent artists, writers and performers. The metro also saw notable jumps in jobs for motor vehicle manufacturing (up 61%), accounting services (up 37%), general freight trucking (up 17%) and specialty hospitals (up 15%).

7.  Provo-Orem, Utah
Added over 24,000 jobs since 2010, up 12% (427 new jobs per 10,000 people)

This mid-sized Utah metro is well concentrated in a number of fast-growing tech industries: software publishing (up 51%), computer systems design (up 30%) and semiconductor manufacturing (up 14%).

8. Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington, Tex.
Added over 267,000 jobs since 2010, up 9% (400 new jobs per 10,000 people)

Part of the so-called Silicon Prairie, Dallas saw a boost in jobs in computer systems design (up 32%) and communications equipment manufacturing (up 18%). Other key areas for growth include oil and gas extraction (up 27%), office administration (up 22%) and credit intermediation (up 13%).

9. Bakersfield-Delano, Calif.
Added 33,000 jobs since 2010, up 11% (394 new jobs per 10,000 people)

Growth in this metro has been fueled by agriculture-related industries such as crop production (up 14%) and dairy product manufacturing (up 11%). Bakersfield has also benefited from an upswing in utility system construction (specifically, oil and gas pipeline), an industry that has more than doubled in employment since 2010 and is nearly seven times as concentrated in Bakersfield than the national average.

10. Charlotte-Gastonia-Rock Hill, N. Carolina/S. Carolina
Added over 70,000 jobs, up 8% (381 new jobs per 10,000 people)

In addition to spectator sports (up 37%), this metro also experienced growth in tech-related industries such as telecommunication carriers (up 31%), management, scientific and consulting services (up 22%), scheduled air transportation (up 17%) and data processing and hosting (up 14%).