Business cards? On paper? Now? Yes, say executive communications strategists--but they should be different than before. More reductive. Edited down.

In a word: simpler. Says Jay Harper, a winner of Build's design contest: "It is quite common to come across business cards that are so overly designed they are hard to even look at." Simple will make you stand out.

In this first design by Chelsea Rae Kardokus, white space helps draw the reader to one thing and one thing only: the company name. Bold, all-caps type emphasizes the name. Script leads the eye from name to website. The words and icons emphasize social media--and that you "get" the world you live in.

White space helps draw the reader to one thing and one thing only: the company name.

In this second card by Jay Hahttp://admin.inc.com/wp-admin/post-new.phprper of The HD Factory, diagonal lines represent the fictional name of the company, which is "Forward." To boost social media versatility, the card uses basic images, like the arrow, that will work easily as the visual ID of your brand on the web, Twitter, and Facebook. In addition, the proper font can speak as loudly as the logo and colors. On this card, the fonts are purchased, not free, so fewer people will have them.