Are your company values clear and compelling? Do you recruit for them?

Once you’ve learned how to set them (see my previous blog you need to ensure you recruit with your values in mind-;here’s how.

Many clients ask for help in streamlining their recruiting processes. Here’s what is often going wrong:

  • Candidates aren’t being screened for alignment with company values
  • Candidates aren’t being asked enough self-revealing questions
  • Recruiters aren’t using rapport techniques to powerfully put candidates at ease-;which would result in them revealing who they are

A job interview is a candidate’s “Rock Star Moment”-they’re showing you their best face, so it’s up to the recruiter to ensure that it’s an accurate face, a face we can rely on, a face that is honest. Here’s a sample list of recruiting questions that apply to all roles in a company:

  • Which of our company values are most aligned with your personal values? Why?
  • Please tell me some times in your career when you’ve most powerfully embodied our values?
  • What are the five career accomplishments you are most proud of? Why?
  • What are five adjectives used to describe you by: colleagues, bosses, friends, yourself?
  • What makes a working environment most compelling?
  • Where do you want to be career-wise in three years? Five years?
  • What is your mission in life, and why would working with us help you achieve it?
  • What is the most important thing in life? How do you ensure you honor it?
  • Please tell us a bit about your past entrepreneurial experiences and why/how you’d fit in with us.
  • [Add all of your role-specific questions here.]

When a CEO asks us to perform a Cultural Assessment prior to launching our neuroscience-based leadership programs, I am always curious to learn what the number one individual motivator is. More often than not it’s Individual Development Plans (IDPs), and the lack of them is super problematic. Think about it.

Each team member across your company should know their next two possible evolutions (promotions imply a raise/title change, which may not occur)-whether they are up, across, or within. The “within” evolutions are when their current role takes on significant new responsibility or acquires a new skill set (like training a customer service rep in sales techniques  to enable performance bonuses when their new skills are demonstrated).

IDPs can be planned with a one- to three-year time horizon. What’s essential is that they are monitored, and the individual’s development is actually happening. Components of an IDP are:

Professional Development Portion:

  • Two or more possible career evolutions that can occur in the coming one to three years
    • Job skills that need to be gained for each
    • Leadership skills that need to be gained for each
  • A timeline for acquiring these skills
  • A plan, budget, and leadership commitment to support the plan
  • Next steps and monthly or quarterly check-in on plan progress
  • Agreement that the plan will be driven by the individual, not by their leader

Personal Development Portion:

  • Personal growth that the individual wishes to undertake (weight loss, fitness goals, learning new language, stop smoking, etc.)
  • Mapping of how this personal growth will benefit the company
  • A timeline for acquiring these skills/creating this growth
  • A plan, budget, and leadership commitment to support the plan
  • Next steps and monthly or quarterly check-in on plan progress
  • Agreement that the plan will be driven by the individual, not by their leader

If the individual is in a leadership role or will be in the next year so, consider a Leadership Development Program to cultivate them.

Values-based recruiting and retention makes all the difference. Let me know how it works for you!