Searching for a new job--or trying to decide if you should stay at your current one--can be incredibly time-consuming and more than a little stressful. Once you finally update your resume, you'll probably spend countless hours combing through job listings, applying to through web portals, and waiting....and waiting...to get that coveted interview.

Now Google is making that process a lot more streamlined by introducing some important new features to its recently launched job hunting tool.

This week, the search giant announced that along with aggregated listings from job services such as LinkedIn, Monster, CareerBuilder, Glassdoor, Indeed it will provide salary information. This new embedded result will display as a range (rather than an exact number) and is based on the specific job title, location, and employer.

The Goog is drawing and displaying info from partners who specialize in salary info (Glassdoor, PayScale, LinkedIn, Paysa and others). Should the job actually list the salary (which is the case only 15 percent of the time, according to Google,) the search engine will display a comparison to the range for that particular role.  

Another welcome search perk: Google is providing a location filter that makes it a lot easier to hone in on jobs that are close to you, or easily commutable. Select a distance from two to 200 miles, or--if you're open to relocation--chose "anywhere."

As you start seeing jobs that interest you, you'll have flexibility as to how and where you can apply for those roles. Should Google spot the same job in multiple locations, it will give you the option to view the job on your preferred site--very likely the one where you already have an account and your resume saved.

In the next few weeks, Google will also turn on a feature that enables you to save job postings so you can opt to apply a later time. You'll simply bookmark them with a single click, and you can return to them as soon as you're in the Google environment again.

Which is...pretty much always. Happy hunting!

Published on: Nov 16, 2017
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