Netflix recently snagged the No. 10 spot on LinkedIn's Top Companies of 2018 list. On Glassdoor, the average rating from employees is 3.7 out of 5 stars. That's not as high as Google's (4.4 average) or Facebook's (4.5), but getting a job at Netflix is still a decently in-demand gig.

So last week, the streaming service and media company offered some insight about getting a job and working there. In a LinkedIn post that garnered more than 1,000 comments, Netflix invited people to ask their most burning questions.

They didn't respond to every single one. Many people inquired about specific roles or positions within the company. A lot just wanted to get paid to watch Netflix. (If you're hoping to turn your binge-watching hobby into a full-time salaried job, forget it.)

Netflix responded thoughtfully and in detail to several questions. Here were the top seven questions and answers about getting a job at Netflix, edited for clarity and length.

1. What does Netflix look for in an ideal candidate?

TL;DR: First, you have to be qualified. In the interview process, Netflix looks for candidates who embody their values. Read the Netflix culture memo.

Netflix's response: You need to have relevant experience for the role you are applying for and on top of that, when you interview in person, demonstrate qualities that showcase Netflix values.

Are you courageous? Are you humble? Are you curious and passionate and ask thoughtful questions about the business? Are you able to and open to providing and receiving feedback to be better? Are you scrappy, have grit and willing to roll up your sleeves regardless of your title? Are you a team player? Are you inclusive and self aware?

These are all things we look for. If you read the culture memo at jobs.netflix.com, it will provide more of a perspective on what we look for.

2. Do you get to watch Netflix at work?

TL;DR: Don't count on it. Maybe, if you're working on a Netflix series and your job requires it.

Netflix's response: Freedom and responsibility - you choose how you want to spend your day doing what. No one is saying you can or cannot do something, but you have to be responsible in moving the business and making an impact. For some teams it is necessary to watch our titles because they work on them.

3. Are there jobs at Netflix where you get paid to binge watch and give your feedback?

Netflix's response: Mmm, no.

4. Does Netflix have remote positions?

TL;DR: Doesn't sound like it.

Netflix's response: Typically, no. That being said, it occasionally happens if a team sees a specific need. Any jobs, regardless if they are remote or not would be on our site jobs.netflix.com.

5. Is it worth applying if you're over 40? Does Netflix discriminate based on age?

TL;DR: Candidates of all ages are invited to apply. The company makes a concentrated effort to be a diverse and inclusive workplace, though they acknowledge they have more room to grow.

Netflix's response: We have many conversations about inclusion and diversity and age is one of them. We want to make sure personal bias does not impact the hiring process. There is always room to grow and we are continuing to learn and have those conversations. There are many employees over the age of 40, although some teams skew slightly younger and we can work on making them more diverse from an age perspective. Thank you for asking because it is important!

6. Do Netflix employees have set hours or work a certain schedule?

TL;DR: Not really. It sounds like a pretty flexible workplace.

Netflix's response: Nope. Freedom and responsibility - you do what works best for you and Netflix. As long as you are performing successfully and making an impact, you can create your own schedule.

7. Do you need a specific degree to work at Netflix?

Netflix's response: The degree is less important than your work experience.

Interest piqued? There are currently more than 500 roles open at Netflix. Over half of them are based in Los Angeles and Los Gatos, California. Take a gander to see if one is a good fit for you.

Published on: Sep 17, 2018
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