Searching for a new job can be daunting and time-consuming. You update your resume and dust off your interview skills. You invest time and emotional energy, never knowing when you will meet your goal -- finding the right company, the right role, and the right job offer. But if you are a digital marketing manager, you might not be waiting for long.

The need for skilled digital marketing managers is high. From 2017 to 2018, the number of SEO jobs increased by 43 percent, and the number of content marketing jobs rose by 33 percent. According to research from Forrester, CMOs will spend almost $119 billion on search and email marketing, display advertising, and online video by 2021.

Why is this growth happening? Forrester says it is because video, display, and social advertising will become increasingly important over the next five years. Companies are putting greater emphasis on quality over quantity, which requires digital marketing experts who can drive meaningful results.

As the co-founder and CEO of Aha!, one of the fastest-growing software companies in the U.S., I understand how important digital marketing is. And I know how challenging it can be to find people with the right experience. This is why our team looks for candidates who have a combination of practical knowledge and a proven record of taking on new challenges.

If you are searching for a new position or want to grow in your current one, you need to understand and hone these skills for yourself. Here are nine skills you need to get a digital marketing job:

High-low thinking

Digital marketing requires you to think about the big picture. The best digital marketers take a goal-first, strategic approach to marketing. But you cannot just think at a high level -- you need to also live in the details. This means being attuned to the mechanics of your online campaigns, as well as the work that is being done by your teammates.

Endless curiosity

The best digital marketers are researched-obsessed. This requires an appetite for digging into the details, exploring the data, and always asking what you could be doing better. You are not satisfied with the first answer or result and are often the first person asking, "Why?"

Pattern recognition

It is about the data. Besides understanding and tracking metrics, you need to be skilled at identifying patterns in the numbers. You can then extrapolate that information to turn your analysis into action.

Healthy skepticism

This data-driven mindset needs to be paired with skepticism. This is because data cannot tell you everything you need to know. Learn when to trust the numbers and when to rely on your own knowledge of the work and customer.

Real creativity

It is obviously not all about the numbers. Creativity is also essential to digital marketing. Marketing teams always need people who are able to drum up the new -- ideas, channels, tactics, messages, and ways of working.

Proactive communication

It might not be immediately obvious how your work impacts or intersects with others. Be proactive and responsive in all your communications, whether you are helping a teammate or sharing a status update.

Natural persuasion

Do you know how to draw people in? Obviously, you need to be persuasive to create compelling marketing materials. But this skill helps when you are sharing your plans with cross-functional teams and seeking buy-in from leaders.

True empathy

Reaching people takes more than persuasion; it requires a real connection. The best digital marketing managers understand others on a deep level -- fears, struggles, and motivations.

Pioneering spirit

It takes a truly bold person to break through the noise and make an impact in the world of digital marketing. You need the courage to move into the unknown and explore new ways to connect with your audience.

You might find that some of these skills come naturally, while others still need some work. Consider what you need to work on and how you can improve. Think of it as another step in the job search. You want to come to the end knowing that you trained as hard as you could.

Published on: May 9, 2019
The opinions expressed here by Inc.com columnists are their own, not those of Inc.com.