A couple weeks ago, I came across yet another resume from a candidate touting a degree in entrepreneurship. It's something I'm noticing more and more, and it's not just in my imagination. College Raptor reported a 572 percent increase in degrees or certificates in entrepreneurship studies between 1995 and 2013, and that demand is continuing to drive university course offerings.

When I started my business 28 years ago, entrepreneurship wasn't sexy. But with the combination of wildly successful founder stories, technology innovations, the influx of startups, shifting attitudes about work, and the popularity of Shark Tank, that is clearly changing. This fall, bright-eyed students across the country will enter entrepreneurship classrooms, many of them hoping to be the next great industry disruptor.

These students should proceed with caution.

Getting a degree in entrepreneurship isn't going to make you the next Mark Zuckerberg or Evan Spiegel. In fact, if that's your goal, studying entrepreneurship may be counterproductive. Before I explain, let's acknowledge that there are several different types of entrepreneurs and ways to be entrepreneurial.

If your goal is to open a local franchise or run a division at IBM, you may very well benefit from entrepreneurship classes. But if you were born to deliver new solutions that transform markets - let's call this type an "inventrepreneur" - you don't need entrepreneurship classes to make you better.

I realize I may ruffle some feathers with this point, but it's been my long-running belief that if you weren't born to be an inventrepreneur, pursuing a masters in entrepreneurship won't make you one.

The problem is that an inventrepreneur is inherently someone who delivers what no one knows yet - who puts things out that no one's ever thought or dreamed. We're talking about people like Steve Jobs, Thomas Edison, Cirque du Soleil creator Guy Laliberté, and Spanx visionary Sara Blakely, among others.

Entrepreneurship education, on the other hand, is about delivering knowledge and giving students a frame of reference based on what's already known. See the problem? If you're meant to be an inventrepreneur, you're born with entrepreneurial instincts and the ability to connect disparate dots and see solutions where no one else can - it's simply not something that you can teach.

This is not to say that education in general isn't valuable for inventrepreneurs, or that there aren't strategies that will make you more effective. As an inventrepreneur in the travel industry, there have been a number of influences throughout my life that have made me stronger and more creative. Among them: experimenting, failing, and experimenting again.

So, what can inventrepreneurs do to develop their skills and grow professionally? Here are five strategies that worked out well for me.

1. Invite culture into your life.

Exposing yourself to new cultural experiences outside of work - music, food, wine, art, theater, people outside your circle - is one of the best ways to keep the flow of inspiration coming. Some of my best business ideas have come to me while listening to a new song or trying new cuisine, or seated outside an office and among new people. I actually signed up for a painting class a few months ago. Art helps you imagine the world in a new way, which then spurs original and outside-the-box business thinking.

2. Travel the world.

Nothing changes your perspective like travel. Early on at my company, there was a period when I was considering shutting down - and then I took a life-changing trip to Tibet. For the first time, I witnessed a country where people were driven by spiritual decisions, and had an epiphany about the role that emotion can play in running a business. It changed the course of my company, and inspired my evolution as a leader. Travel introduces you to new worldviews, people and communication styles that can transform your entrepreneurial journey.

3. Pursue a liberal arts education.

A liberal arts education encourages open conversation, soul searching and curiosity. Contrary to what some aspiring entrepreneurs may believe, learning history, languages, literature, political science or philosophy is far from useless. These types of courses will help you build strong analytical, writing and critical thinking skills - qualities far more valuable to an inventrepreneur than learning about entrepreneurship itself.

4. Mix, stir and serve with confidence.

In some ways, I liken entrepreneurship - and inventrepreneurs in particular - with what it must be like to be a great chef: you put ingredients together that weren't meant to be put together, then put them in front of people and brave ridicule. The truly successful, palate-changing chefs have to possess an extraordinary, unnatural amount of confidence. The same holds true for would-be changemakers in business: If you have the burning need to mix ideas and serve up new solutions in these fickle, fast-changing markets, go into it with the confidence of a three-star Michelin chef.

5. Just do it.

When I speak to audiences about leadership, one of the most common questions I get goes like this: "How do I know if I'm ready to launch a company? How do I know I won't make a mistake?"

My answer: "Take a seat. You're not ready."

Inventrepreneurs understand that there's never going to be a perfect time to launch a company. They don't think about the prospect of failing or making a mistake; instead, they're driven by a burning, unrelenting desire to get their ideas to market at any cost. They never question it. They don't have an option to not do it.

Rather than spend years planning the perfect launch, inventrepreneurs learn the best and most valuable lessons by integrating their personal interests with their professional, then just going for it. If you want to build something that truly changes lives and shakes up industries, experience is the best education there is.