• Lyft has pulled thousands of electric pedal assist bikes from the streets of New York, Washington D.C. and San Francisco, the company said.
  • Streetsblog New York reported the pedal-assisted bikes first began disappearing from the Citi Bike map in New York over the weekend.
  • DC's Capital Bikeshare and San Francisco's Ford GoBike, which are also both owned by Lyft, also pulled their electronic bikes, citing similar reasons.
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  • Lyft has pulled thousands of electric pedal-assist bikes from the streets of New York, San Francisco, and Washington D.C., the company said Monday.

The company, which operates bike-share programs in roughly a dozen US cities through its acquisition of Motivate in 2018, said the move was out of an abundance of caution and only affecting the three specific cities. E-bikes have been hitting fleets as part of the company's commitment to expanding the program, it's said previously.

"We recently received a small number of reports from riders who experienced stronger than expected braking force on the front wheel. Out of an abundance of caution, we are proactively removing the pedal-assist bikes from service for the time being," the blog post said. "We know this is disappointing to the many people who love the current experience -- but reliability and safety come first."

Streetsblog New York reported the pedal-assisted bikes, which allow riders to reach speeds of 18 mph thanks to an electronic 'boost,' first began disappearing from the Citi Bike map over the weekend before an announcement was made at 5:00 am Sunday.

Citi Bike has plans to roll out 4,000 pedal-assisted bikes over the course of 2019, according to its website. The bikes cost an additional $2 to use, an upcharge that is waived for Citi Bike members until April 27th.

Streetsblog New York reported DC's Capital Bikeshare and San Francisco's Ford GoBike, both of which are also owned by Lyft, pulled their pedal-assisted bikes on Sunday as well, citing similar reasons as Citi Bike.

Lyft has had a hectic few weeks. The company went public on March 29th, listing on Nasdaq and opening at $87.24. However, the stock price has continued to drop over the past few weeks, sinking to a new low of $58.28 on April 12 following rival Uber's announcement of its own IPO filing.

The New York Times reported Monday that dozens people had encountered the issue, injuring some as they fell off the malfunctioning bikes.

--This post originally appeared on Business Insider.

Published on: Apr 15, 2019