It's happens every day. Whether it be a simple difference of opinion, or a deeper more impactful issue that creates disagreements. Conflict will occur in your world at one point or another.

How you handle yourself can define your career, your reputation and (not to overstate) your life. 

Toxic relationships don't have to kill your motivation, drain your energy or kill your passion.  If you have identified that you do have a toxic relationship, now you must confront it. Burning a bridge is not the goal. The world doesn't need more people who are right. What we're looking for is understanding, healing and a re-birth of a formerly productive relationship. 

Here are specific techniques use, to confront the situation in a peaceful and productive way.

Be Honest. 

"I'm going to tell you the truth about ______"

Coming clean about the situation is the best way to set the stage for healing. If you sugar coat things here, you could run into trouble later.  Lay it all out, but be respectful. No personal jabs, or childish lashing out. 

Share How You Feel. 

"When we argue I feel ____"

When you're bouncing from one emotional state to the next, you can feel confused and off balance.  Stating how you feel when the person does something will make the situation real for them.  

Ask them to change with you.

"I' want to hear your side _____" 

Since I've been honest with you, and told you how it makes me feel, are you willing to meet me half way and stop doing that? Now that you've cleared the air, it's time to heal.  Understand that in their world, you are the toxic person.  There is rarely a conflict when one person is right, and the other is wrong. 

Especially at work. Most times everyone has the same mission and goals. Stress, and other outside factors impact our performance.  How we deal with each other can set a tone in your organization that will permeate your culture. 

Don't try to get your way, or even agree with their way. Look to land on the right way to move forward for your organization. 

Published on: May 25, 2016
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