Absurdly Driven looks at the world of business with a skeptical eye and a firmly rooted tongue in cheek.

We're living in an era of enormous, and enormously fast, change.

Of course we can blame the thoughtless, heartless mind of technology.

We, though, have allowed it to systematize our behavior and reduce our sense of natural human feeling toward someone else.

I'm moved to this snippet from a (putative) mindfulness seminar by the sudden emotions of those who run ad agencies.

They're shocked, stunned and positively hurt that employees are treating them with utter disregard.

As Digiday reports, one agency head of talent -- um, fancy word for HR, I suppose -- declared themselves "flabbergasted" by employees' recent behavior.

What are these miscreants doing? They're quitting and walking straight out. Or, at least, not offering to work their two weeks' notice period.

Naturally, agencies are snorting it's millennials who are doing it.

Is it because they don't realize that giving two weeks' notice is an alleged act of decency?

Or is it because they really don't give a flying pig for their bosses' feelings?

Some suggest new employers are insisting on instant start dates. 

Of course, the fact that there's relatively full employment doesn't help. It might encourage diminished loyalty.

Naturally, I'd like to weep for these ad agencies -- and, I understand, it's not just the ad business that suffering from this apparently rude self-interest from employees.

Then again.

For years, companies haven't exactly shown too much human feeling toward those they hire.

They fire people and ask them to leave instantly. Sometimes, they even have security march them out of the building in order to ensure no company secrets are stolen.

Employees are fired by phone, by email and, on occasion, they walk in one morning and see their station is occupied by someone else.

Promises are made by management and broken. They're excused by changing circumstances.

Too often, those changing circumstances are merely the need to maintain profit margins, so the senior executives can receive their bonuses.

Millennials have watched how their parents were treated by corporations and realize, I suspect, that there's no such thing as loyalty at all. 

Everything is a transaction and the only necessity is accumulation.

Which is one way to run a business, or even a society.

Ultimately, it may not be the best one.

Published on: Jul 6, 2019
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