Absurdly Driven looks at the world of business with a skeptical eye and a firmly rooted tongue in cheek.

Coffee and business go together like Play-Doh and children.

You need coffee to wake up. You need coffee to keep going. You need coffee to be perky.

Some people, however, overdo it. 

The perkiness, as well as the coffee-drinking.

Yet a mind-boggling new study suggests that drinking many cups of coffee a day really isn't so bad for you.

And when I say many, I mean a lot more than three.

The study, performed by researchers at Queen Mary University of London examined whether coffee contributed to increased arterial stiffness. 

Previous studies had suggested that it does.

These researchers, however, examined light coffee drinkers, moderate coffee drinkers and those people whom you stare at in the office, while muttering: "Are you alright?"

Here's the study's bracing conclusion: 

Drinking coffee, including in people who drink up to 25 cups a day, is not associated with having stiffer arteries.

Wait, so even if you drink 25 cups of coffee a day your arteries won't be affected? By the coffee, at least?

It seems not. As the researchers press release puts it: 

No increased stiffening of arteries was associated with those who drank up to this high limit when compared with those who drank less than one cup a day.

Please, I wouldn't dare suggest you imbibe 25 cups of anything in one day. Not even water.

Excessive behavior rarely leads to moderate results or healthy outcomes.

Here's a fascinating aside from the study: those who were moderate or extreme coffee drinkers tended to smoke and drink regularly. Oh, and they were also male.

The point of the research, though, is that many might have been moved by previous headlines suggesting coffee should be avoided because of its potential harm to the heart.

This research found no such link.

Still, I'll stick to my one Starbucks Almond Milk Latte a day, if you don't mind. 

Published on: Jun 5, 2019
The opinions expressed here by Inc.com columnists are their own, not those of Inc.com.