Absurdly Driven looks at the world of business with a skeptical eye and a firmly rooted tongue in cheek

 

It's one thing to like your boss.

You might even appreciate, respect and admire your boss.

But how many employees would dip into their own pockets and buy their boss an Apple watch?

And how many would buy their boss a Tesla?

I ask this only because that's what the employees at Gravity Payments just did.

CEO Dan Price posted news of this gift to Facebook.

"Shocked. Still in disbelief. Never imagined this was possible," he wrote.

I think most CEOs would, indeed, be in disbelief. But perhaps you remember Gravity Payments.

This is the company whose CEO who raised the minimum salary of his staff to $70,000 and then encountered a few difficulties.

First, some employees were miffed that those who they thought made a smaller contribution were now being paid excessively.

Then there were rumors that all this apparent generosity might be a response to lawsuit taken out on him by his older brother.

But last week Dan Price won the lawsuit.

Perhaps, then, there was great relief among the employees that they wouldn't have to suffer some immediate strife.

In a YouTube video, employees explain how excited they were to buy the boss a blue Tesla.

This had apparently been his dream.

The employees were worried whether he'd accept the gift in good grace or whether he'd worry what impression it would give to the outside world.

Still, when he walked outside with them he began to weep, as they all filmed with their iPads and large phones.

The employees had saved for six months. They say they wanted to thank Price for all his sacrifices and how he always had their backs.

Not too many CEOs get accused of that.

What about the math, though? Gravity has around 120 employees. Let's say this Tesla cost at least $75,000.

That means each employee chipped in around $625. Which, depending on your perspective and good fortune, is either a lot of money or not that much.

Just imagine what the 13,000 employees at Facebook could buy their CEO, Mark Zuckerberg.

But what would be the point, I hear you mutter. He can afford anything he wants.

Oh, but it's the thought that counts.

 

Published on: Jul 20, 2016
The opinions expressed here by Inc.com columnists are their own, not those of Inc.com.