At 27, Jessy Dover, cofounder and creative director for online handbag company Dagne Dover, may be young and full of energy but says she's plenty qualified to give advice on how to stay centered when work is demanding and chaotic. "New entrepreneurs can get bogged down by so much stuff," she says. "Knowing how to manage it is fundamental to actually being successful."

She's doing something right. Two years ago, after selling hundreds of bags in just a few months without any marketing, Dover and another cofounder of the company toured Asia to meet with and build relationships with factories that work with top brands in the handbag industry. Since then, Dagne Dover has expanded its offering to five versions of its bags, with plans to begin selling three full collections in the spring. This year, the company is on track to grow 325 percent over last year to have a multi-million dollar year. Here are her must-dos when it comes to keeping your sanity when work is crazy.

Find time for three to four good workouts a week.

Whether it's a run, long walk, boxing or whatever other kind of exercise you prefer, moving your body helps your mind take a break from the demands of work. "It makes you feel like you can conquer the world," she says.

Meditate and reflect every day.

Dover does this first thing in the morning and at night before falling asleep. "There's so much that goes on every day and there are so many conversations that happen," she says. "It's important to think about what you've learned, think about how you can move forward and not make the same mistakes or improve things that you've already done."

At the end of your work day write your to-do list for the next day.

Dover learned this habit from a woman she hired 10 years her senior. "When I'm finished with the day I can check out, got to my workout, go meditate, do whatever I need to do," she says. "I know that everything for that day has been taken care of and everything for the next day is planned and [I'm] feeling good about it."

Published on: Aug 25, 2015
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