"Don't be boring."

When I asked Amanda Lannert, CEO of Jellyvision, what  advice she had for people who are looking to get a job, that's the answer she gave. 

As a CEO of a rapidly growing 400-person company, soon to be 500 people, Lannert has done her fair share of hiring.

"It feels like companies hire people, but in fact people hire people," she explained. "By and large, recruiters are bored. People play it safe. They commodify themselves into just a bullet-point list of skills and experience." 

By not being boring, Lannert pointed out how you'll catch a recruiter's eye, and make yourself much more likely to land that initial phone call or interview. 

At the same time, it's also a great way to assess the fit of the role for you, as a prospective employee. When you show who you are as a candidate -- what you value, what environment you work best in -- and don't get a call back, that company may be saving you some time and energy. 

How do you not be boring? Here are five things to try:

Focus on the cover letter, not the resume. 

At Jellyvision, Lannert shared how they place supreme emphasis on the cover letter. "There's nothing more refreshing than seeing someone who takes a chance to be incredibly human in a cover letter or an outreach, to put themselves forward," she says.

This means language that's real, down to earth -- not stiff, business jargon-y, and cut from some googled job site template. As someone who's reviewed thousands of applicants for jobs, I'd often set aside an application when the person would start their cover letter with, "I'm interested in X role. Please see my resume attached." Everybody writes that in their cover letter -- focus on saying something different.

Show, don't tell.

A few years ago, a friend of mine wanted to land a job at Trunk Club, a company he'd been dreaming to work for some time. The only problem was that they weren't hiring at the time. I suggested that he show them what he had to offer the company -- not just tell them. So my friend whipped up a 50-slide PowerPoint presentation detailing ideas, suggestions, and projects for exactly how he could improve their online presence and user experience. He did the work of showing how he'd be an asset to the team -- not just telling. Lo and behold, they created a role for him and offered him a job.

Get creative.

As a CEO myself, when I was hiring our company's first full-time programmer several years ago, I'll never forget how one applicant wrote me a poem -- yes, a poem -- perhaps 20 lines long that described who he was and why he desired the role. While we didn't end up selecting him (he lived outside the United States and we required that the person live stateside), I remember that application so vividly even years later. He took a chance, got creative, and stood out from the 400+ applications we received in the first 72 hours alone. He was far from boring, and it worked.

Demonstrate you want this job, not just any job. 

Another way to not be boring is to make it clear:  "I want to work here, nowhere else." This past year, when we were hiring for our Chief Technology Officer role, someone took the time to build a custom software application, just for Know Your Company. He'd replicated the Know Your Company software to the best of their ability, using what he'd gathered from screenshots he'd seen online. His intention was to demonstrate that he was technically up to snuff for the role. 

My greatest takeaway was that it showed he wanted to work here, and nowhere else. I was impressed by him wanting this job, not just any job, and that caught my attention.

Sound like yourself.

Perhaps most importantly, you should make sure you sound like yourself. Don't try to write a poem if you're not good at writing poems. Don't try to be funny in your application if you're not funny. Be thoughtful in portraying the truest version of yourself -- not what you think the employer wants to read.

If you're concerned about how to do this, the key is simply to take put a little time and care into your application. Don't rush your writing your cover letter. Think about how you can thoughtfully show who you are and what you can bring to the company. When you pour considered thought and energy into something, your true self will come through. Being not boring is about being yourself, more than anything else.

Keep this credo of "Don't be boring" in mind, as you apply for a job. Dare to be different, and stand out from the sea of bullet-pointed list resumes and bland cover letters. The less boring you are, the more memorable you are. And the more memorable you are, the more likely you'll land the job you want. 

Published on: Nov 2, 2017