Launching your business is tough, but it's even more complicated when your team is worldwide. We ran my recently-acquired app, Cuddlr, across two continents and three countries, which meant 3 am start times, late-night conversations, and sleep somewhere in between.

Jane and Cory Turner doubled down on Dogly: Not only did they launch the successful humanitarian app from their respective American and Asian locations, but they are working together as mother and daughter. I talked with former Ogilvy and Mather exec Cory about starting a company with your mother, how to manage a 12-hour time zone difference, and why social good is the new social currency.

Where did the idea for the Dogly app start?

We grew up taking care of animals. At the same time, my Mom was the publisher of Men's Health and worked with Ralph Lauren, and I was at Ogilvy & Mather Asia.

I saw the time and effort people were putting into photos of their dogs: They are getting attention, agent representation and book deals. On the other side, I saw animal shelters with no resources and the dog pictures they posted were very rough. Why not bring these two world on opposite ends together?

Dogly enables these "celebridogs" to get the attention and all the loves (on their photo) gets them donations to their favorite shelter and potentially a monthly grant, too.

Social good is the new social currency: It's not just getting likes, but actually doing something with the likes.

And you launched a year ago... while you and your co-founder were on different continents. A 12-hour time difference.

For the first year, my mom was in Connecticut and I was in Shanghai. We also had a few people in New York. I was moonlighting while I had a full-time job running new business for Ogilvy across 18 markets. 

I was running Dogly early morning and late at night to catch America when it began and ended its day. It worked out kind of well, as it gave us a 24/7 team: When I was leaving, my mom was working, and vice versa. I can imagine the reactions to the emails at odd hours!

I actually left Ogilvy in the summer, so now I'm also in Connecticut and 100% focused on Dogly. It's different to be in the same time zone.

That is intense. How did you manage?

The overlap was about nine months. We were in the ideation stage (in 2015) and launched in January, which is when it really got intense.

In terms of how we balanced things, it kind of changed. When I was over there, working with my mom as cofounder, we'd have to schedule "Mom time": We'd have conference calls about business, but then there were times when we just needed family time, like catching up on daily life. Scheduling "Mom time" was funny, but necessary.

You left a high-powered position to pursue your startup full-time. How are things different now?

I knew I wanted Dogly to be a success, so I had to jump into it. If you want to do something on the side, like a "nice to have" or "nice to do", I could have done both careers. I had been with Ogilvy for five years - I could continue and go to the next level or do what I was super passionate about, take a leap of faith and create something that may be big down the road.

We had so many ideas on how to grow it. There would be no way we would execute it with half my brain focused on another company's timeline.

You left a high-powered position to pursue your startup full-time. How are things different now?

I knew I wanted Dogly to be a success, so I had to jump into it. If you want to do something on the side, like a "nice to have" or "nice to do", I could have done both careers. I had been with Ogilvy for five years - I could continue and go to the next level or do what I was super passionate about, take a leap of faith and create something that may be big down the road.

Co-founder relationships are complex, but working with your mother must be a different kind of experience.

We go to events and people always say they've never heard of a mother-daughter run startup, but we've always done things together. When I was younger... I planned and organized a major fundraiser for the local animal shelter, where my mom was president. The fundraiser is now in its tenth year, so we've been working together for a while.

It helps that she's creative, while I'm organized. Excel gets me excited, while she is artistic and thinks outside of the box. We're different, but aligned, as we're big animal lovers, know the marketing and branding world, and want to create work that benefits shelters as well as people.

Now your focus is only on Dogly. What's next?

It's the first generation app now, just to test what people like and how to be most helpful to dog lovers and shelters. We're now doing a resource-heavy upgrade to the app and integrating it more into our users social media world, eventually growing into a web-based version. We're connecting all things dog.

As far as funding, we launched with a friends and family round. We're now actively raising a small angel round.

You've already had some traction, so your schedule is unlikely to slow down. How will you be keeping your life balanced?

The thing about Dogly is that our space is a happy place. Yes, it has been super stressful, particularly when I was overseas, but it is all about dogs. We get emails from shelters, emails about how grants are being used, all totally making me cry. It's a business based on love.

It's also about connecting with others. About once a month, we'll visit a shelter and record short, online videos featuring the shelter owners and the dogs. It's usually a half-day shoot, and it's so valuable to leave your desk and to meet people or play with dogs.

I think people get stuck behind a desk and think that making a PowerPoint is going to make their business grow. It is really about meeting with people.