There are a few myths about public speaking: You have to be an extrovert, you have to be a natural to do it and you have to be a professional public speaker to find the skill useful. I've debunked the first two, and TED, with its new Masterclass app, is trying to debunk the last.

TED-Ed curator Ashley Kolaya told me like this:

We built this iconic forum for public speakers to give their viewpoint, but we believe your speaker story is worth sharing if it can be useful to your audience. It transforms the public speaker stage from our [TED] red circle to any opportunity you have to interact with a group of people and give them something useful - whether it is a staff meeting, in an interview or in another setting. You have the opportunity to give them a gift.

I spent most of October on the stage, but the powers of public speaking go well beyond the keynotes. Here's why.

Be useful

We built this iconic forum for public speakers to give their viewpoint, but we believe your speaker story is worth sharing if it can be useful to your audience.

"Doing a TED Talk" may be on many entrepreneurs' wish lists, but why? The notoriety and prestige feels good. The impact of a TED Talk, though, is unique - it obviously didn't invent public speaking.

A simple reason is, when done right, TED Talks give more than they take. They are about the message rather than the messenger.  They inspire rather than promote.

Be useful.

Own the room

It transforms the public speaker stage from our [TED] red circle to any opportunity you have to interact with a group of people and give them something useful - whether it is a staff meeting, in an interview or in another setting.

Think about the public speaking experience: You have a group's attention for a limited amount of time to convey your big idea. Can't the same be said for a job interview? What about a board meeting? How about a pitch to one of your customers?

When you answer an interview question, speak up at a meeting or are asked about your new business, you are essentially stepping into your own TED red circle. Treat it as such.

It's not about you

You have the opportunity to give them a gift.

Someone once asked me if I ever get nervous before a talk. I told them, "Every time". They then asked me how I get on stage.

"The importance of what I need to give to the audience outweighs my fear."

That may be the secret to strong public speaking: Your need to give your gift outweighs your own insecurities. Your success at conveying your big idea lies not only in your communication, but in your intention.