Your money mindset is a narrative you tell yourself about money, and it's based on your sense of worthiness.

If you feel unworthy, you'll tell yourself a story filled with head trash about what you can't afford, what you'll never do, and how careful you have to be.

On the other hand, if you feel worthy, you'll tell yourself a story about what you'll achieve with your investments, what good causes you'll enjoy spending money on, and how excited you are to get started.

Your sense of worthiness determines your money mindset.

How Your Money Mindset Keeps You Comfortable

Your mindset doesn't want you to have too little, or too much, money by establishing a money set point. That's the level of income your mind would never let you sink down to or go beyond.

Let's say you quit your job to start a business. You live on your savings until your business takes off, but it takes longer than you expected. As your situation gets worse, you take drastic action to make sure you and your children don't live on the streets. That could mean taking a job you don't want or borrowing money from your parents--anything so you don't slide below the income and lifestyle you're okay with having.

But your money set point doesn't only tell you having too little money is a bad thing. It also makes you believe having too much money is bad. So, the idea of being very rich is uncomfortable even for people who desire wealth.

Can you see yourself riding in a gold-plated Rolls Royce, living in a $245 million mansion complete with its own power plant, or drinking a $2 million bottle of champagne? Some people would find that much wealth downright scandalous, perverse even. That's because it's way beyond their comfort zone.

In other words, your money set point creates mental boundaries for how much money you allow yourself to have. It limits your success through procrastination and self-sabotage.

That's fine for most people who are content with linear and incremental growth. But for entrepreneurs, it's a dream-killer.

Kick Your Fear to the Curb

A low money set point is based on fear, and the first step to mastering your fear is to understand it and talk about it. Talking it through takes away its power.

Ask yourself: "Why does that scare me?" If you keep going deeper, the chain ends with "I don't think I can handle it."

But you can handle more than you think. Think of an experience you didn't think you could handle... but you did. Things are scarier in our minds than in real life, and it helps to have some perspective.

Faith also helps. Faith in yourself and your motivations, in your community, in your ability to persevere. Most of all, have faith in your vision. If it's worthy, then so is your work towards that vision, and so are you.

2 Hacks to Increase Your Money Set Point

Take these two powerful shortcuts to hack your sense of worthiness:

1. Accountability

Hold yourself accountable to others. Find the people who need you and make your success about them.

You may be uncomfortable beyond your boundaries, but that doesn't matter, because this isn't about you. It's about the people you serve and what those people need you to do and to be.

Fear is selfish, plain and simple. It's all about you, your experience, your struggles.

Courage, on the other hand, is selfless. You put aside and move past your fear, because others are counting on you to do so. That doesn't make it easy... it just makes it necessary.

Who's counting on you? Who needs for you to succeed? If their need is greater than your fear, then the fear becomes irrelevant.

2. Community

Don't do it alone. We really are stronger together, and when the people around you expect more and better, your world expands to match those expectations. And any doubt you feel about your worthiness will be dispelled by reminders of how you've served your community.

When you operate from a mindset of fear, your anxiety leads to poor decisions with negative outcomes. When you operate from a mindset of worthiness, your peace of mind leads to wise decisions with positive outcomes.

Published on: Aug 22, 2017
The opinions expressed here by Inc.com columnists are their own, not those of Inc.com.