You go to the gym because you want to experience improvements in your health, appearance and lifestyle. Perhaps it is convenient to spend time on a treadmill catching up on missed TV shows, but the bottom line is that you want to cut the calories in the most efficient way possible.

A new partnership between health and performance leader EXOS and fitness products company Precor is intended to empower the corporate warrior and the amateur athlete with the ability to maximize workouts. Starting July 2016, it will bring EXOS' Energy Systems Development (ESD) technology to Precor equipment via Preva, the largest fitness cloud in the world. It has the potential to be a game changer for EXOS' bottom line and for productivity in the workplace.

The key to the EXOS/Precor partnership is connectivity.

Trainers will have access to all of their data on each piece of Precor equipment, as each device, whether it be a treadmill, elliptical machine or stationary bike, will be connected to the cloud via the Internet. The technology consists of the same methodology EXOS -- a trusted source for training football players for the National Football League Scouting Combine -- uses in training elite athletes.

The integrated technology could serve as a big boost to the workout regimen of corporate employees who seek to maximize every minute of their valuable time at the gym. Additionally, if a user is traveling and staying at a hotel with Precor equipment, then all of the data will still be accessible via the platform.

The partnership easily connects to the workplace.

"If you're a corporation offering a fitness center to employees, then you could log in at site and a prescription program loads and starts the machine," explained John Golden, President of Product Pioneering at EXOS. "Typically, a company buys equipment and pays an annual license fee for access to the program."

The annual licensing fee per machine will be $500, which may be assumed by employers seeking to enhance productivity in the workplace. Individuals will also have the opportunity to subscribe on their own in order to have access to the technology on Precor equipment around the world.

If you belong to a fitness center such as Equinox, you will be able to contract with EXOS and the company will provide the service to you as long as you are on any one of the roughly 50,000 pieces of Precor cardiovascular machines already connected to Internet, many more of which are Internet-enabled, but not currently being but to use. Golden says that all Precor equipment in production is being built with Internet connectivity.

More energy and less pain for the corporate warrior.

Increasing your anaerobic threshold and metabolic efficiency sounds great. In practicality, it means adding power for longer distance and converting your food to energy more efficiently. That's important for the corporate employee who strives to be more effective inside and outside of the workplace.

"When we measure populations, in the corporate world you're looking for more energy and less pain," said Golden. "We can now automate the test on a piece of cardio to self evaluate yourself. It takes self evaluation and feeds information into a prescription engine. We will control speed, inclination, resistance and track it all."

Cutting calories based on an algorithm.

The ESD system learns your tolerance and goals as you go. EXOS' partnership with Precor allows the company to put the platform into hundreds of thousands of machines in production.

"When you think about cardio equipment, the play is that most people have taken a standard treadmill and put technology on it . . . chasing the idea of infotainment and raising the cost," said Golden. "The average person will flip through channels and burn 200 calories in that experience. We haven't put entertainment on those devices. We believe people are getting on these devices to achieve a certain outcome. To achieve a much more efficient experience."

Golden says that studies show 83% of people who ride ESD connected cardio prefer it over traditional cardio.

Published on: Mar 29, 2016
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