To be truly successful in business, you should never stop learning and growing. But Unless your company provides training opportunities, you may be at a loss as to how to get the learning you need. Local colleges and training centers are good options, but you're likely too busy building your career to take time out for classroom learning.

Fortunately, the internet makes it easy for a professional to access training from the comfort of home or the office. Many courses can be stopped and restarted at any time, eliminating the multi-hour commitment that comes with classroom-based training. Through the use of learning platforms, businesses can equip their employees to become more productive and happy. Here are six learning platforms that can help your business get started.

TOPYX

At the enterprise level, a Learning Management System (LMS) is the best way to provide learning across an entire organization. With TOPYX, leaders can set up an unlimited number of internal training curriculums designed for specific job or department roles and monitor progress, adjusting as necessary. The LMS can be connected to a business's existing software, including Salesforce, to efficiently train employees without a multitude of portals and passwords. Employees can take courses in the office or on the go, using their mobile devices or PCs, and management can easily report and analyze results.

Blackboard

Blackboard invests in the idea that learning is a lifelong experience, with education continuing long after a person leaves the classroom. The business section of the site is stocked with courses designed for small businesses, corporate, associations, and more. In addition to help with creating courses, Blackboard provides easy-to-use mass notifications to allow businesses to communicate with everyone taking their classes.

Grovo

Each business has its own culture and Grovo acknowledges that. Courses can be tailored to meet a company's unique work environment, complete with pre-made training courses that can be tweaked to fit your own needs. Grovo also offers Handbooks, which lets businesses put together a collection of micro-learning videos designed to quickly onboard new employees and give existing team members an overview of a business's health benefits, security policies, and more.

Moodle

An open-source learning platform, Moodle is completely free and fully customizable. The tool can be customized for a large number of students or only a few. Teachers can take advantage of the easy-to-use interface to create courses, which students can then take on their computers or mobile devices. Administrators can set up user dashboards to look exactly the way they want, ensuring each employee sees courses displayed as intended.

eSSential

eSSential starts off qualifying new clients with a package to kick start their employee learning. The package includes 120 courses, as well as one custom course designed specifically for your organization. Businesses can then add to that course selection with their own custom-designed classes using built-in Claro Authoring Software. Included courses range from soft skills like effective listening and teamwork to safety courses to keep employees healthy in the workplace.

BizLibrary

If your business deals with compliance issues, BizLibrary may be the best option. Stocked with a library of courses on issues such as HR compliance, leadership skills, and industry-specific content, this tool has what many businesses need to get started. Once BizLibrary is in place, employees can take any of the courses in the library at their own pace, giving them 24/7 access to training, whether they want to take a class while at work or on their own time.

When a business invests in its employees' training, that business benefits from more engaged, career-conscious workers. By setting up a learning environment that makes it easy for employees to get the education they need on their own schedule, your business will position itself to grow and thrive in an increasingly competitive marketplace.

Published on: Sep 28, 2016
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