Hardly a day goes by that I don't receive at least one product announcement or press release that starts by with a statement that the writer is "excited" about something or other. Here are some real-life examples from my email inbox:

  • "We are excited to share our new website!"
  • "I'm excited to share the launch of my new book."
  • "We're really excited to tell you that our..."
  • "We're excited to tell you about a new way we..."
  • "We're excited to announce the latest version of..."

I think that people begin announcements with the word "excited" because they're hoping that their excitement will prove contagious. But that won't ever happen, for the following three reasons:

1. It's trite.

To be effective, an announcement must communicate that the product being announced is special enough to be worthy of the customer's attention. Beginning an announcement with a tired word communicates that the product is just more same-old-same-old.

Bad: "I'm excited to share the launch of my new book."

Better: "I'm beyond ecstatic that my book is finally published."

2. It's colorless.

To be effective, an announcement must stick in the brain, which means following the adage "show don't tell." Telling the customer you're "excited" mentions the emotion but lacks punch. To be memorable, use vivid words to describe (show) the emotion.

Bad: "We're really excited to share our new website!"

Better: "Your eyes will pop when you see our new website."

3. It's all about you.

To be effective, an announcement must be about customers and not about you, nor your company, nor your product. Starting your announcement by (tritely) stating your emotions tells the customer that your focus is YOU not THEM.

Indeed, announcements that start with "excited" are almost always a litany of stuff that's obviously important to the writer but probably of limited (or no) interest to the customer. Remember: customers are only interested in themselves; if you're not talking about THEM, they're bored.

Bad: "We're excited to announce the latest version of..."

Better: "We asked you what you wanted most. Now we're giving it to you."

Published on: Sep 1, 2018
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