I'm a huge fan of entrepreneurs. I'm a huge fan of people who start their own businesses.

But I'm also a huge fan of dipping your toes in the water before diving completely in.

Here's a guest post from Ryan Robinson, an entrepreneur and marketer who teaches people how to create meaningful, self-employed careers. (His online courses "The Launch While Working Formula" and "Writing a Winning Freelance Proposal" can teach you how to start and grow your own business while working a full-time job.)

Here's Ryan:

No matter how rewarding a full-time job in tech may be, for plenty of entrepreneurial spirits out there, there's one thing that's even more meaningful than great pay and solid benefits: working for yourself.

Before we get too far, if you are interested in launching your own business but feel stuck because you lack the tech skills, check out Skillcrush's free "10-Day Coding Bootcamp." In this email course, you'll get a taste of what it's like to work in tech, and even get to write your first lines of code.

Choosing the path of entrepreneurship is without a doubt riskier than holding a 9-to-5 job, and requires way more sacrifice. You have to take the time to discover your strengths, focus on building them, and get into a business that allows you to leverage your top skills.

However, once you're reaping the lifestyle benefits of being your own boss and making significantly more money than you ever could at your day job, the hard work will all have been worth it.

The question I'm asked the most (by far) when I meet and speak with fellow tech entrepreneurs is, "How do I know which business I should start?" This is always quickly followed by, "How do I start it while I'm still working my full-time job?"

This makes perfect sense. With the number of apps, online tools, and businesses that already exist, it can be difficult to come up with the right idea you should be spending your time on. The majority of us don't have the luxury of being able to quit our day jobs to pursue starting a business today without having to worry about how we're going to meet our financial obligations moving forward with no immediate income.

And if you're new to tech, you're probably a little unsure about exactly what business you, as a beginner, can start. Well, it turns out that lots of tech companies were launched by total beginners. In reality, you'll learn best by doing. But it's still understandable if you're nervous about putting your life and income on the line for a brand new business venture.

That's why I'm a huge advocate of always starting a business while working full-time, so that you can test your way into your new product or service, get feedback, validate the business idea, and start generating income before you quit your job.

When I set out to start a new business, I always make sure it aligns with both my core competencies and my passions. In other words, I need to be good at it and also love doing it. It's how I make sure I'll be engaged, even when the going gets rough.

With that in mind, I put together this list to help give you some starting points on proven business ideas that can be executed on. All of these can also be pulled off while you still keep your day job and primary source of income. And the good news is that a lot of these businesses are actually excellent for honing your tech skills and transforming you from a beginner into an expert.

If I missed any good ones, please share your best ideas for tech-related side businesses in the comments below! If you're ready to get started on a business while you're still working, join my course on launching while working.

1. Web Design

Web designers are incredibly valuable for technology companies. Web design is all about mastering the art of creating a beautiful, value-driven experience for the people using a website or app. There are always new websites popping up in need of professional web design, and Skillcrush offers a very in-depth "Web Designer Blueprint" you can complete in just three months to build your foundation as a web designer.

2. Online Courses

If you're an expert at something, there's going to be an audience of people online who would be willing to pay to become self-sufficient in your field. If you do development work for a client who'd like to learn how to cover the basics on her own, so she can stop paying you for ongoing work, why not embrace that reality and offer her access to a set of online courses that'll teach her the basics of what she wants to accomplish? Even if you just have a client you'd like to start lessening your workload with, offer to put together a customized package of content for him to learn how to satisfy his own needs after you're gone, and place a premium value on that content.

A great concrete example of how to do this is to create a guide for your clients on how to use and update the WordPress site you built. Then you can sell that package as an online course or resource!

3. E-books

Packaging your new skills and knowledge into a downloadable e-book that delivers value to those seeking to learn in your field, advance in their careers, or start their own businesses, makes for a strong value proposition if you target the right audience. Check out Leslie Samuel's great guide to selling e-books online and start building your strategy.

4. Freelance WordPress Developer

Countless small businesses start out their web presence using a WordPress hosted website before needing to upgrade to other solutions for various reasons. Many of them will pay several thousands of dollars for someone to get them set up online, especially if they need customized features outside the scope of a limited template. You'll be able to set your own hours, select the clients you want to work with, and work remotely from wherever you choose. Enroll in the "Skillcrush WordPress Developer Blueprint" to get the skills you need to make it happen.

5. Online Coaching

As with online coaching and selling e-books, when you have something you're skilled at and very passionate about, you can turn that winning combination into a service you can offer with one-on-one online coaching.

Regina Anaejionu will give you a step-by-step plan for putting your skills and experience to work by developing an online coaching business. Check out her content for a jump-start on this career.

6. Web Development

As a web developer, you'll have incredibly valuable skills that are in extremely high demand. Once you command a knowledge of HTML, CSS, and some JavaScript, you can start taking on freelance projects to build your portfolio while you still hold your full-time job. In the "Skillcrush Web Development Blueprint," you'll learn HTML, CSS, JavaScript, and jQuery, and even get a start on the much-loved Ruby programming language.

7. Podcasting

If you can create a regular audience for your podcast that teaches others how to advance their tech skills, this is a great way to get sponsors. At CreativeLive, I regularly pay $50 to $250 (or more, depending on audience size) per episode for a 30-second advertisement on relevant podcasts like The Tim Ferriss Show, the No. 1 business podcast right now.

Naturally, it helps if you already have an online audience you can tap for listening to your regular podcast, but that hasn't stopped thousands of people from building successful businesses on the back of podcasting and offering free content on specific topics. Listen to this great episode of the Conscious Millionaire podcast for an interview with John Lee Dumas on how to make money podcasting.

8. Affiliate Sales and Marketing

If you already have a website that's driving in targeted traffic, a great way to make passive income from the content you're already creating is through affiliate marketing.

Perhaps your blog content is geared toward teaching others how to build their own WordPress websites or create custom plug-ins, or you offer free tutorials on building a mobile app. You can monetize the traffic to your website using Clickbank, Skimlinks, and Rakuten--all great affiliate marketing tools and networks that can help you make money from the content you already produce.

9. Tech Blogging

Think blogging is no longer a viable source of income? Think again. Thousands of bloggers creating content around the applications of tech skills are launching self-employed careers thanks to a combination of collecting blog subscribers, affiliate marketing, sponsorships, and other revenue streams. Start with Amy Andrews's ultimate, free "Guide to Making Money Blogging."

10. Landing Page Specialist

If you have a way with words and know how to make keyword-friendly, beautifully designed, search-engine optimized landing pages, why not charge others for your services? Even a short, customized landing page is worth a couple hundred dollars or more, in most cases. Just check out what Freelance Copywriter Mike is up to for some inspiration.

11. Develop an App

Sometimes it seems like there's an app for everything. Yet somehow, new ones keep popping up and selling for lots of money, all the time. If you spot a niche that hasn't been filled to its potential just yet and you can learn the coding skills, you could be onto something. Just make sure you validate your app idea before jumping too far in.

12. Copywriting for Websites

It's not for everyone, but if your tech skills can get you through the door for doing work with a client, and you also have a knack for writing compelling copy, this is a great add-on service. With experience and a great portfolio, you can charge just as much for your copywriting services as you can for your time developing. Pick up this free guide to launching a freelance writing career.

13. Start a YouTube Channel

If you can create value-driven, entertaining video content around tutorials and actionable tips and tricks, people will be happily subscribe to your regular, free content. If you can grow your subscriber base to a few thousand, your videos can start generating pretty substantial income from the ads displayed on them. Many YouTube users make well into the millions each year.

14. Online Subcontracting

Once you've established yourself as a freelancer, subcontracting your jobs out to other freelancers can help you significantly grow your client list and revenue generating possibilities.

Don't forget to check out Skillcrush's free "10-Day Coding Bootcamp." You'll get a digital crash course, learn what you can do with tech skills, and even get to write your first lines of code.

Published on: Mar 1, 2016