Ever wondered what other business leaders read? Wonder no more. A recent LinkedIn survey on executive media revealed when, where, and how the C-suite engages with content.

According to that study, 60% of executives intentionally use social media platforms including LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter to get news. But what kind of content do they consume?

Here's a closer look from Jennifer Brett, Head of Americas Insights for LinkedIn Marketing Solutions.

Here's Jennifer:

Despite living in a world of ever increasing "snackable" content and listicles, (Jeff: not that there's anything wrong with listicles) executives still see the value in a deeper, more extensive read. In fact, C-level execs share long-form articles most often. The research found that executives have wide-ranging interests: they stay up-to-date on global news, business, finance and cultural trends.

It's fascinating to view the media habits of the C-Suite, but what if we could go deeper to reveal the actual content that catches their eye?

At LinkedIn we are able to explore the specific articles that executives are reading on our platform. To begin, we focused on the C-suite in the United States, analyzing our internal data to reveal the top articles that executives engaged with in the past 90 days.

Here are the types of articles that top executives' reading lists:

1. Building a winning team.

CxOs know how valuable building a high-quality team is to success. This means they never stop seeking the latest advice on how to find and keep great talent.

Our internal findings reveal executives are looking for the best ways to interview and that they are open to creative suggestions (despite the fact that many of them have probably been hiring for a long time!). They are also thinking about how to ensure someone is the right fit for team.

But building a winning team is only the first step. Retaining that team and keeping your best employees is the real key to long-term success. Executives do not want to be complacent and are always thinking about why successful employees quit and new approaches to keeping a great team productive and healthy.

They are also willing to look at what they can do to be great managers.

2. Diversity.

Executives care about diversity because they know that diverse teams win.

Based on our internal data, the C-suite is exploring ways to increase diversity and inclusion -- they want to obtain different perspectives and viewpoints plus increase their awareness of diversity challenges and possible next actions they can take.

3. Lifelong learning.

What's the real key to reaching the top in a career? Executives never stop learning.

One of the most interesting themes that emerged from our data is that executives are always looking for more advice and skills.

It turns out that even executives might not actually have it all figured out and are keen to learn from the (sometimes tough!) lessons of other business leaders.

4. Staying up to date.

Every good business leader knows that their company does not operate in isolation from the world around it. On LinkedIn, the C-suite stays up-to-date on the latest in current affairs, absorbing the opinions of highly respected CEOs and thought leaders.

The top news sources for CxOs include Forbes, The Business Journals, Inc., Yahoo Finance, Harvard Business Review, New York Times, WSJ and Bloomberg.

Regardless of personal views, executives understand the need to absorb different perspectives to fully grasp how myriad issues may impact their business.

5. Modern Technology

A great business leader is someone who accepts that change is always around the corner, embraces it and stays informed on what is happening. Our data certainly suggests that this is the case with the C-suite.

Technology developments are moving at amazing speed, creating some intriguing new use cases, but also potentially upending entire industries.

Staying informed on the latest happenings and potential disruptions is crucial as change continues to come.

Published on: Apr 14, 2017
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