In a tech-driven world, the development of communication technology has influenced the "Net Generation" (a.k.a. people born between 1982 and 1991), bringing them into a world where the possibilities come with immense responsibility, Steve Blank told graduates of Dalhousie University during his commencement speech earlier this week.

"We now know that the way we consume information actually changes our brains," the Silicon Valley entrepreneur told graduates of Dalhousie University during his commencement speech earlier this week. The mass circulation of information has enlightened audiences, broadening their perspectives. However, there's also a darker side to it, as those in power have censored texts and ideas for fear of the "information explosion," said Blank.

Going forward, he urged the graduates to consider the legacy they will leave through the development of communication technology via the Internet. Citing modern issues, such as monetization of data by tech giants--like Google and Facebook--as well as widespread fake news, Blank said that graduates are entering into a world of uncertainties, where computers might even start creating videos with fake information.

Closing his speech, Blank added: "The question is whether you'll tell your children that this decade was the beginning of a new dark age, or whether it was the time of something new and wonderful."