Today we're talking about broad match modifier. 

Why is it so popular? Because if gives you the ability to match on exact keywords while still maintaining flexibility on the entire search term.

Best of all: there's evidence that the Broad Match Modifier option can improve your return.

In this article, we'll cover the concept of Broad Match Modifiers and explain how you can use them in your search engine marketing campaigns.

Broad Match Is Too Broad

As you probably know, AdWords offers a number of keyword matching options:

Broad Match - matches on the keyword plus related words, related searches, and misspellings

Exact Match - matches on the exact keyword

Phrase Match - matches on a phrase within the search term

Broad Match Modifier - matches on words within the search term

By default, AdWords will hook you up with Broad Match. That's a problem.

Why? Because broad match is usually just a little too broad. Your ad will likely appear to people who aren't in your target market.

When some of those people click your ad (and they will), you're going to spend money on those clicks. That cost will eat into your ROI.

However, you also don't want to exclude people in your target market from seeing your ad because they used a slightly different search term than the one you specified.

That's why it's a great idea to use a modified version of Broad Match.

What Does Broad Match Modifier Do?

Broad Match Modifier allows you to specify one or more words within your search term that must appear. For the other words, the standard Broad Match rules apply.

Let's say that you're selling goth makeup online. You market your ecommerce site on AdWords using the search term "cheap goth makeup."

If you let that run with a Broad Match only, you'll end up showing your ad to people who view related searches. One of those related searches is "goth makeup brands uk."

People who search for goth makeup brands in the UK probably aren't interested in your business if it's located in the United States. So you really don't want to show your ad to people who use that keyword.

Fortunately, you can solve the problem with the use of a Broad Match Modifier. In this case, you specify that the words "cheap" and "goth" must be included in the search term. You leave "makeup" alone because you're okay with synonyms for that word.

Now, the only way people see your ad is when they search for a term that includes "cheap," "goth," and a word related to "makeup."

There Are Some Caveats

There's more to the story, though.

For starters, Google will still show your ad to people who use variants of the words you specified for inclusion. In this case, those words are "cheap" and "goth."

That means if somebody searches for "cheapest goth makeup," your ad will still appear. But that's okay because anybody who uses that search phrase is in your target market.

However, if somebody searches for "inexpensive goth makeup," your ad will not appear.

Why? Because the word "inexpensive" isn't a variant of "cheap." It's a synonym.

You'll have to set up a separate keyword for "inexpensive goth makeup."

Keep in mind, though, that you didn't specify "makeup" as a word for exact match. That means Google will use synonyms for that word.

So if somebody searches for "cheap goth palettes," your ad could still appear.

How to Set up Broad Match Modifiers

It's easy to set up Broad Match Modifiers in Google AdWords.

Start by signing in to your account. Click "Keywords" on the left-hand menu.

You'll see a big plus button in the middle of the screen. Click on that and select your Ad Group.

In the text area box, enter the search phrases you'd like to use. Be sure to put a plus sign in front of the words that are required.

For example, you'd enter "+cheap +goth makeup" if you want the words "cheap" and "goth" (or their close variants) included in the search phrase.

Click "Save" when you're done.

If you're already running one or more Broad Match campaigns, you can still apply modifiers to your keywords.

Again, click on "Keywords" on the left. Then, hover over one of the keywords.

Click the pencil icon so you can edit it.

In edit mode, put a plus sign in front of the words that are required in the search phrase.

Finally, click "Save."

Keep in mind that you'll have to follow that same routine for any other keywords you want to edit.

Wrapping It Up

Quit wasting your money on Broad Match keywords. Instead modify them so your ad is less likely to appear in front of people who aren't in your target market. Then, check your analytics to see which combinations are giving you the best return. Focus your ad spend on those keyword options.

Published on: Dec 27, 2017