Scale and growth are hard for a startup to maintain if they're building infrastructure that requires a high burn rate to sustain. When you act on a campaign or a new feature, it's not just about launching that specifically; it's about launching it and then trying to find a way to sustain the administrative changes you've implemented to get the resources for that particular action.

Did you hire new marketing staff for the campaign? Okay, now you've got to have projects, salaries, equipment, space and time for those staff moving forward. Did you invest in new developers? Okay, the same thing applies all over again. It means that you're playing a particularly harrowing game of speed chess where every move costs you a little more time on the clock until you're almost in the red.

When that happens to a startup, their end game has to be pretty quick. There's no room for errors, because when you're out of time and runway, that's the end of the line. You can only scale up so far with infrastructure but you can't scale down without taking a major step back. There's a lot of inflexibility there.

We've always said that Speedlancer is the platform that built itself. That tends to throw people a little, but it's actually 100% true. From the development to the design work to the copy writing and marketing, Speedlancer functions by using its own freelancers to accomplish almost every single task related to running and growing the business. In terms of what we do, we walk the walk as much as talk the talk.

When we make a move, we set the budget for the freelance tasks that we need and we're able to scale up and down instantly by using teams of pros to complete the workflows we need. We're seeing this more and more with other tech companies and agencies who are recognizing the benefits of having access to as much productivity as you need at any given moment, without costing themselves long term stability by investing in heavy infrastructure that can just weigh you down.

At the end of the day, this kind of approach allows for room to move and breath and grow. For a startup, that can be a life saver.

Published on: Nov 29, 2016
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