Starting as a small operation in a garage and now a global giant, it's easy to forget the journey it took for Amazon to become what it is today. Things weren't always peachy for Jeff Bezos and his company.

Before they were acquiring Whole Foods and receiving praise from every corner, they (specifically Bezos) were being questioned for their risky decisions and moves. One, in particular, was the free shipping program, due to the costs.

Many would've felt tempted to cave into the chatter and pressure, but Bezos stood his ground.

Why?

Because he had the most important ingredient for succeeding in life, which is a purpose filled with direction. At Amazon, his philosophy, in 10 words that can also make you more successful with your health and business goals, is: "We are stubborn on vision. We are flexible on details."

Simple and straightforward, but highly effective for becoming successful. As you soak in those 10 words, remember these three key principles for applying them to become a healthier and higher-performing individual:

1. Don't fall into guilt trips and peer pressure.

When you're trying to better your health, your business, and your life, people will often (unintentionally) place doubt and guilt in your mind.

With health, it's subtle comments about passing on foods and drinks you used to say yes to. With business, it's staying in on Friday and Saturday nights accompanied with early morning rises to grind away as opposed to painting the town red and sleeping in the next day.

To handle the inevitable guilt and peer pressure from friends and others, it's essential that you have a concrete vision to keep your focus. This concrete vision allows you to stay the course and not veer off onto the roads that will change your desired destination.

2. Great feats need time to become a reality.

As Bezos states, "If you're not stubborn, you'll give up on experiments too soon."

Each of us has heard the phrase "patience is a virtue." But practicing this is easier said than done.

It's difficult to practice patience living in today's microwave generation, where people expect instant results, and if they're not here today, then it's taken as a signal to quit.

Think of succeeding with your health and business as more of a Crock-Pot that takes hours to finish, as opposed to instant food in microwaves.

Patience is something you consciously develop. The more you practice it, the easier it becomes, while your results begin to expand. Patience leads to smart decision making that isn't emotionally charged.

When you make solely emotionally-charged decisions, this leads to a short-term mentality which neglects your long term.

In wellness, this is choosing fad diets and crazy cleanses for immediately weight loss, despite the potential long-term implications it could have on your health. In business, this is opting for a get-rich-quick scheme that fills your bank account in the present but, coincidentally, will be the very reason your bank account is empty in the long term.

You're here for the long term, not to be a flash in the pan and feel good for a brief moment.

3. Avoid tunnel vision.

Bezos reminds us that, "If you're not flexible, you'll pound your head against the wall and you won't see a different solution to a problem you're trying to solve."

What gets you to point A won't take you to point B. As you keep progressing, you need to continually evolve. This means trying new methods and being open to new ideas to progress toward your new goals. If you're not open to trying new methods, you're going to miss potential opportunities and become stuck at your current level.

Everyone hits a wall sooner or later.

If your weight loss has plateaued, approaching the problem with tunnel vision isn't going to help. You need to shake up the routine with a new fitness plan or by tweaking your nutrition. If your business stalls and leads aren't flowing in, new methods are needed for growth of the business.

Be stubborn with what you want out of life, health, and business. But be malleable to how that vision formulates.

Published on: Jul 19, 2017
The opinions expressed here by Inc.com columnists are their own, not those of Inc.com.