Plenty of entrepreneurs adhere to the mantra of "hire slow, fire fast" and for good reason. Then there's Melanie Perkins, the co-founder and CEO of Sydney-based design software company Canva. She spent a year trying to find her first technical hire.

While Perkins didn't intend to spend so much time filling her first engineering position, looking back on it now, she wouldn't have done it any other way. The year-long quest informed how she's made every other hire since. And it's hard to argue with the results: With 700 employees, Canva is a hiring machine, and it's been doubling in size every year. In an industry that sees engineers switch jobs with frightening speed, many of Canva's early technical hires are still with the company. While Canva won't discuss revenue, Perkins, the company's co-founder and CEO, says the company has been profitable since 2017. Canva has 20 million monthly users in 190 countries. In October, Canva announced an $85 million investment, with a valuation of $3.2 billion.

This is going to be bigger than yearbooks

When Perkins started the predecessor company to Canva in 2007, she was just 19. She was frustrated by how hard it was to use design software. When she started teaching design at university, she noticed that her students were similarly frustrated. With her boyfriend (now fiance), Cliff Obrecht, she built a website called Fusion Books that helped students design and publish yearbooks. It did well--becoming the largest yearbook company in Australia and moving into France and New Zealand. Perkins quit university to work on it full-time. By 2011, Perkins and Obrecht realized Fusion Books could be much more: an engine to make it easy for anyone to design any publication. But to build that more ambitious product, they'd need outside investment.

Perkins headed to San Francisco to visit angel investor Bill Tai, who is known for making about 100 investments in startups that have yielded 19 initial public offerings. She'd met him in Perth a year earlier, where she had collected an award for innovation. "If you come to California, come see me," he remembers telling her. "Without me knowing exactly what she was doing, she engineered a trip. She's a very ballsy woman, if that makes sense. And I'm thinking, you know, I should help her. I know hundreds of engineers." 

Early in her San Francisco visit, Tai introduced her to Lars Rasmussen, the co-founder of the company that became Google Maps. Tai told her that if she could hire a tech team that met Rasmussen's standards, he'd invest. "I didn't realize at the time what that meant," says Perkins. She bought an Ikea mattress, and planted it on the floor of her brother's San Francisco apartment. "Obviously, that was free rent," she says. "I had food to get by and I felt safe."

Perkins set out initially to hire by doing the obvious: She went to every single conference she could get into. She'd speak if the organizers let her. Tai invited her to his MaiTai Global networking event in Hawaii, even though, for most attendees, a big draw was kitesurfing, which she'd never attempted. "It was great fun," she says gamely. Then, "I really don't like it. I have the scars to prove it. I've ... retired from kitesurfing."

Back in San Francisco, Perkins passed out flyers, trying to pique people's interest. She cold-called engineers, and approached suspects on buses. She scoured LinkedIn, but Rasmussen wouldn't even deign to meet most of her finds. "He didn't think they had enough startup gumption or experience with a world-scale company, or with complex technology," she said. She says fewer than five LinkedIn finds ended up interviewing with Rasmussen. He'd give them a problem-solving challenge that, inevitably, they flubbed.

After a year of this, Perkins was thoroughly frustrated. Surely it's better to at least make some progress, she told Rasmussen, than to continue to do nothing. But he was adamant.

The perfect candidate and the bizarre pitch deck

That same year, Rasmussen introduced her to two candidates that he thought might be a good fit and recruitable. The first, Cameron Adams, a user interface designer who had worked at Google, was busy trying to raise money for his own startup. The second, Dave Hearnden, a senior engineer at Google, initially said he wasn't interested. In 2012, both had a change of heart.

"We were absolutely over the moon," says Perkins. Adams came on board first, as a co-founder. Hearnden, on the other hand, started to have second thoughts: Google wasn't happy with his leaving, obviously, and was trying to get him to stay. He worried that his project would be abandoned without him, and he didn't want to disappoint his team. 

At this point, Perkins sent him something that has since become known as the Bizarre Pitch Deck. In 16 slides, the deck tells the story of a man named Dave, who longed for adventure but was torn by his loyalty for Google. In the pitch deck, as in life, Dave eventually joined Canva. It helped that Google had already poached his replacement. 

In 2012, Perkins was able to raise a seed round of $1.6 million, and got another $1.4 million from the Australian government. Tai finally agreed to put in $100,000. "It was really hard for her to raise," he says. "You've got a young girl in her 20s from Australia who had never worked at a company, with her live-in boyfriend as COO. People would say to me, What if they break up? I didn't have a good answer." Now, things look much different: Tai says Obrecht is Canva's "secret weapon," and that "Cliff has just blown me away."

Keeping the bar high, hundreds of hires later

While Tai drove her nuts at the beginning, Perkins appreciates his stubbornness now. "We've been able to attract top talent across the globe," she says. "It wouldn't have been possible without setting such a high technical bar early on." Tai says he hasn't made exactly this condition with other startups. But he's done it in reverse: He's backed highly technical people without knowing what, exactly, the business opportunity would turn out to be. 

The experience also showed her, the hard way, just how much effort she'd have to put into hiring if she wanted to build a successful tech company. By Canva's second year, the company had a recruiting team. "We knew we needed to invest heavily in hiring," she says. Now, each open position gets a strategy brief. That document lays out the goals for the person in that role and the project they will be working on. It also identifies the people who will be involved in the hiring process. "Getting everyone on the same page is really critical," says Perkins. "It sets that person up for success."

And like Rasmussen looking for the first technical hire, Canva asks each candidate to take a challenge. Candidates have a choice of doing a four-hour challenge or a one-hour challenge. "Maybe they're working parents and they can do it in an hour," says Perkins. "Other people prefer to have a longer time and work at their own pace. We're looking for people happy to take on challenges and who get a real buzz out of being able to solve hard things."

In in-person interviews, someone on the Canva team will almost always ask the candidate, "How would your previous boss or manager talk about your work or rate you?" Perkins says people are "surprisingly honest" in their responses. The answers help her get a window into what type of leadership allows a particular candidate to thrive. Some people require a lot of structure or hierarchy, she says, and Canva doesn't have much of either.

"One of the things I believe quite strongly is having a really strong idea of where you're going," says Perkins. "I have this visual metaphor. Plant 100 seeds. Until eventually one flowers or sprouts. For most people, if you're rejected, you feel really hurt and don't want to continue. The reality is that you have to push through. If I had given up quickly, I certainly wouldn't be here today."