"Personal brand" is far more than just another buzzword--it's one of your most valuable assets. Your personal brand is also much more than just how you are perceived in your industry. A strong personal brand can have a tremendous impact on both your individual success and that of your company. However, building your personal brand is no different from building the brand of your company--it takes time, effort, and dedication.

Thought Leadership (with Benefits)

Some people dismiss the notion of personal branding. This is a serious mistake, and one your competitors are just waiting for you to make.

A strong personal brand confers numerous benefits besides being thought of well in your industry. Establishing and maintaining a strong, recognizable personal brand can help you win the kind of business you want from clients you respect, open doors to previously inaccessible leadership opportunities, and offer new levels of professional recognition and prestige, to name but a few.

Simply put, the harder you work on your personal brand, the more benefits you can expect to experience. As with anything in business, you only get out what you put in.

The ABCs of Personal Brand-Building

Whether you're a small fish in a big pond or a household name in your industry, the chances are pretty good that you're already doing at least some of the following things to build and strengthen your personal brand.

If you want to beat the signal-to-noise ratio and truly stand out in today's media environment, you need to be doing more--a lot more. Is your social media presence authentic, or do you come across as just another mouthpiece? Are you always looking out for number one, or do you take the time to build relationships and help others? Is your voice unique, or are you struggling to be heard?

Follow these 26 tips by Feldman Creative and Placester to make your mark and build your personal brand.

Published on: Oct 9, 2014
Like this column? Sign up to subscribe to email alerts and you'll never miss a post.
The opinions expressed here by Inc.com columnists are their own, not those of Inc.com.