One of the biggest reasons entrepreneurs often fail to ask for help is that most believe their business is so unique that others can't possibly understand it, according to Lolly Wolly Doodle CEO Brandi Temple

And that's largely true, Temple says, but even though the nuts and bolts of different businesses vary, most leaders share similar startup experiences.

For example, when Temple started Lolly Wolly Doodle, a children's clothing company, she, like many entrepreneurs, possessed sheer tenacity, which allowed her to grow something from nothing. "It was just that inside of me -- that I wanted to succeed." she says. 

On the other hand, she, also like many entrepreneurs, initially thought of herself as a one-woman show. Therefore, she neglected to hire and grow a team that she could really trust.

"I would have built probably a better team from the beginning because that would have saved me a lot headaches, and I would have gotten a little more sleep," she admits.

The point is, no matter how innovative your company is, there is likely someone out there who has been in a similar place and can offer you some good advice. 

"All of us as entrepreneurs and business leaders, we think our businesses is so different and so unique," Temple says. "And although a lot of it is, there are experts out there that can help us, and I just did not rely on that early enough on."

For more on the shared experiences of staring up, check out the video below.

The Skills Trap Most Entrepreneurs Fall Into
Published on: Apr 2, 2015