It sounds like common sense to say thank you to those who work for you and work with you, but it in reality this common sense wisdom is not practiced as much as it should be.

Some people say they don't have time or can't afford to show appreciation; others may have good intentions but just never think of it in the moment.

But if you think of it in terms of payoff--giving you and your organization more stability and less turnover (and, as a result, greater efficiency and cost-effectiveness)--it's about investing in an important relationship.

In survey taken by Globoforce, more than a third of workers felt unappreciated and were looking for new jobs despite the security they may have at their current job. There was a direct correlation between workers' intent to look for a new job and the level of recognition they receive at work.

It's a simple but important truth that people who feel appreciated and respected are more motivated than those who think their efforts go unnoticed. They are more engaged in the work they do, and they're more committed to their teams and organizations because they know they're making a difference.

Here are simple but effective ways to say thank you to those who work for you

Say something nice. Be personal and specific. Set time aside; don't make it an afterthought on your way to doing something else. Stop, look at the person, and tell them how much you appreciate what they're doing.

Extend your thanks to colleagues: Sincere praise also helps you develop good working relationships with colleagues. These same colleagues are often very willing to return that feeling of goodwill: this means that they're more likely to lend a helping hand or share some useful information when you need it.

Be consistent. Consistency is vital. When you say thank you regularly, people are likely to work harder. But if you praise often during one month, and then skip the next month entirely, your team will wonder what's going on. Creating a culture of recognition and reward is important - so once you start, make sure you continue.

Be specific and personal. When you praise someone, be specific about what they did to deserve the recognition. This approach not only makes the person you're praising feel more positive, but also lets everyone know that you're paying attention.

Expand your horizons. Your most talented and hardworking team members are  likely to receive praise frequently (which may be part of the reason they perform so well). Remember to include team members who get less recognition; it might be that a little appreciation is all that they need to flourish.

Release Dopamine. An interesting aspect about praise is the chemical reaction it causes in us. Research shows that when we hear something we like, a burst of dopamine is released in our brains. Dopamine is a neurotransmitter that's associated with feelings of joy, pride, satisfaction, and well-being.

The bottom line is that learning to say thank you is vital. The more you thank people, the more motivation they will have and the harder they will work.

Because at the end of the day people want to be appreciated and thanked for what they do, and that is what they remember most--more than the raise, more than the bonus, more than the promotion.