For those of you who are interested in checking out what television has to offer this fall in the way of business news, here is a brief survey:

* "Wall Street Week" (Public Broadcasting System). At 13 years old, the granddaddy of investment shows, it is broadcast Friday nights. Host Louis Rukeyser begins with a commentary and review of the week's action, talks with three analysts, and then interviews a special guest. (Half hour)

* "The Nightly Business Report" (PBS). A regular nightly program, concentrating on stock market news, commentary by prominent economists, and interviews with chief executive officers; broadcast at varying times on 233 stations throughout the country to an audience of 4 million. (Half hour)

* "Enterprise" (PBS). A series of 13, single-subject feature shows per year. Stories are current, diversified, and people-oriented. Topics have included everything from Braniff International Corp.'s bankruptcy to the arrival of Kentucky Fried Chicken in Japan. "Enterprise" may be the best business reporting on TV. (Half hour)

* "BizNet News Today" (Chamber of Commerce of the United States). A morning program on Washington developments affecting the financial and business communities. Policy analysts offer regular reports on taxes, energy, environment, labor, federal procurement, consumers, small business and regulation. (One hour)

* "Ask Washington" (U.S. Chamber of Commerce), A daily call-in talk show featuring such guests as Sen. Orrin Hatch (R-Utah), chairman of the Senate Labor and Human Resources Committee, and Jack Anderson, muckraking reporter. (One hour)

* "It's Your Business" (U.S. Chamber of Commerce). A syndieated, moderated discussion/debate on a topical issue featuring Chamber president Richard Lesher and three guests; shown on 155 stations. (Half hour)

* The Wall Street Journal Report" (Independent Network News). A weekly roundup of stories from The Wall Street Journal, produced jointly by Dow Jones & Co. and Independent Network News, shown on more than 80 stations. The show emphasizes business news and features that "will interest and entertain the viewer," according to Dow Jones vice-president of news services William R. Clabby. (Half hour)

* "Moneyline" (Cable News Network). The first nightly economic newscast on the air and the highest rated show on CNN. "We cover the economy. Anything that will effect our viewers' wallets, we put on the show," according to Lou Dobbs, executive producer and anchor. (Half hour)

* "Inside Business" (CNN). A Sunday evening interview with CEOs of major corporations, including such guests as David Rockefeller, Charles Brown, and J. Peter Grace. (Half hour)

* "Market Update" (CNN). Regular reports on the firiancial markets, offered every hour on the half hour during business days.

* Financial News Network. Twelve hours of business and financial news Monday through Friday. FNN is broken into 12, one-hour segments covering bond, commodity, and stock markets, and offers interviews with analysts, professional investors, and commentators, Although a general audience may find the material too detailed, professional traders find it invaluable.

* "Business Times" (Entertainment Sports Progamming Network), A morning business "briefing," offering hard news, features, and interviews. It is broadcast live at 6 a.m. (eastern time), then repeated on tape an hour later. (One hour)