Eleven times a year, the money-management magazine FACT publishes the FACT investment Report Card, which chronicles the fate of $10,000 put into a representative sampling of investment opportunities. The latest edition of the report, reprinted here, shows roughly what $10,000 would have been worth on September 30, 1983, if invested one year earlier and five years earlier in the items listed.

Two cautions in interpreting the data: Since some of the listings are based on indexes, the results aren't necessarily indicative of an actual investment's performance. Then, too, the listing represents two points in time. No single top performer (particulary a volatile item like rare coins) can be counted on to do well at the time.

One year ago Five years ago

1. Coins $16,310 1. Coins $51,262

2. OTC stock 15,808 2. Growth funds 24,362

3. NYSE stocks 15,091 3. OTC stocks 22,322

4. Growth funds 14,850 4. Silver 19,911

5. Platinum 13,822 5. Gold 18,586

6. Silver 13,719 6. Chinese ceramics 18,464

7. Stamps 13,333 7. Money market funds 17,923

8. Income funds 12,429 8. Income funds 17,629

9. Corporate bonds 11,940 9. NYSE stocks 17,409

10. Yankeebond 11,772 10. Treasury bonds 16,302

11. Ginnie Mae Bonds 11,596 11. Yankee bonds 16,204

12. Municipal bond funds 11,594 12. Ginne Mae bonds 15,113

13. Treasury bonds 11,310 13. Corporate bonds 14,794

14. Diamond 10,941 14. Platinum 14,173

15. Old masters paintings 10,904 15. Gems 13,915

16. Money market funds 10,7873 6. Single-family income 13,904

17. Passbook account 10,572 17. Stamps 13,333

18. Single-family home 10,371 18. passbook account 12,954

19. Gold 10,253 19. Old masters paintings 12,543

20. Gems 9,686 20. Municpal bond funds 11,836

21. Chinese ceramics 9,673 21. Diamonds 7,750

(c) FACT, The Money Management Magazine, 711 Third Avenue, New York, NY 10017. Reprinted with permission.

Published on: Jan 1, 1984