* Lee Iacocca ate two dozen raw clams on the half shell at his first interview for the top spot at Chrysler Corp.

* John C. D. Bruno, owner of The Pen & Pencil, in Manhattan: "The power lunch used to be an exclusive male province -- you could walk into any restaurant at lunchtime and it was obvious from one look, this was not a game for the ladies. Now, 50% of the lunch customers are women doin'biz."

* Seafood is in, red meat is out for the power lunch. Those who feel a bit insecure about their power can compromise with a salmon or swordfish steak, still very much macho.

* U.S. companies will spend more than $250 million on business meals this year.

* Business lunchers stiff their companies by about $25 million a year.

* Forty percent of the Manhattan men and 61% of the women surveyed by Nation's Restaurant News in 1985 said that they would rather eat in one of the city's finer restaurants than have sex. Sixteen percent of the men and 17% of the women were undecided.

* The power lunch costs an average of $20.27 in New York City, excluding tax, tip, and liquor. You can power your lunch less expensively in Billings, Mont. -- just $7.38.

* Michael Korda, editor in chief of Simon & Schuster, who coined the term power lunch: "What you eat at a power lunch couldn't matter less. It's a question of making an appearance, making an impression. One of the best ways of impressing someone you're with is saying hi to Henry Kissinger."

* The most important power lunch in colonial America occurred on March 22, 1621, as recorded in the Chronicles of the Pilgrim Fathers of the Colony of Plymouth: "About noon we [Pilgrims] met again about our public business. . . . Squanto . . . signified unto us, that [his] great sagamore, Massasoyt, was hard by . . . Captain [Miles] Standish- . . . met the king at the brook. . . .He drunk a great draught, that made him sweat all the while after. He called for a little fresh meat, which the king did eat . . . . Then they treated of peace. . . ."

* And now, the Austin Tea Party: power lunchers in Texas prefer tea (37%), followed by soft drinks (32%), water (20%), coffee (11%), and alcohol (5%).

* At President Reagan's issues lunch on St. Patrick's Day, the White House chef served corned beef and cabbage, boiled potatoes, and carrots. And green ice cream.

* The premier power eatery in Silicon Valley is the Lion & Compass, founded and co-owned by Nolan Bushnell, of Atari Inc. and Pizza Time Theater Inc. fame. For technology deals, the restaurant is de rigueur. So too for foreign and industrial spies. "If you really want to spy, just pull up a stool and listen," says one Silicon Valley habitue.

* The economics of a salmon steak: A fisherman catches an eight-pound salmon near Juneau, Alaska, and sells it to a local fish broker on the pier for $15. The fish broker nets $5 by selling it to a local fish distributor for $20. The distributor sells the salmon to a wholesaler at Manhattan's Fulton Fish Market for $28. The wholesaler gets $32 from a local distributor who, in turn, sends it on to the Power Restaurant for $40, or $5 per pound. After filleting the fish, each usable pound costs $8. But don't fret for the restaurateur: each one-pound entree on his menu sells for $19. That $15 fish on the pier fetches $95 for the restaurateur -- and perhaps helps seal a $10-billion merger.

* Power etiquette: pick the restaurant yourself; get there first; don't grab the check if your lunch date outranks you; show that you recognize all the most important people; and never, but never, lunch with the same person more than once a month.

* A Washington lobbyist: "I signed a big client recently at Maison Blanche. I met him, we talked, and that afternoon he sent over a messenger with a contract. What did it? I don't know -- but I doubt it was the turbot. The same thing could have been done at the International House of Pancakes."