Some may think that having feelings of uncertainty as an entrepreneur is given. Speaking from experience in the matter (in fact, almost two decades worth), the only thing that I can say for certain is that there will always be some ups and downs -- with any job, not just entrepreneurship. 

As I've come to learn over the years, it can definitely be a little nerve-wracking to be faced with new situations every single day. Without a solid team, a plan for your future, or a strong support system, it's understandable that this can lead to a pretty overwhelming state of mind -- especially when you're also the one who's supposed to be calling all the shots. 

It takes time to find your groove, but what truly matters is how you cope with these emotions in the moment, as they can be what eases your anxiety in the long run. Creating healthier habits for handling these feelings can be one of the most beneficial things you can do for your career, especially when it can positively and productively improve your well-being and work-life. With that in mind, here are some of my best tips for kicking those feelings of doubt to the curb.  

1. Speak to someone. 

Whether you seek to find help through a mentor, a co-worker, or a close friend or family member, find someone you can share your fears, insecurities, and emotions with. Having someone to bounce your thoughts and ideas off of is crucial to help reduce the stress that you're inevitably going to experience. 

Nothing can be gained from holding in your anxieties, as the only thing they can do is continue to fester into even worse ones. It may seem like you're a one person team at times, but you have to remind yourself that your support system is there for you, and that they want you to succeed.

2. Improve your team (or their roles). 

Having a strong team around you is key to creating a healthy workplace environment. Having a team that is capable of handling their own tasks makes your job easier -- and is really the reason that you hired them in the first place. 

If you're feeling uncertain about the future of your company, look to your team to see how they're impacting it. Can there be any shifts or improvements to help alleviate some of the pressures on your own plate, and allow you to focus on more important or pressing ones in the meantime? Consider whether more can be done (or if more people can be hired on) to help better the flow and workload at your business. 

3. Let go. 

Most of the time, the fear of uncertainty comes from the unknown. Not having control of a situation can be a stressful thing to come to terms with, especially for type A's like myself. However, relinquishing the need to always be in the driver's seat is key to scaling your business.

Having your company stay stagnant is detrimental since no growth will make it impossible for you to keep up with your competitors; embrace the unknown, and consider it a win when you experience it.

4. Focus on what matters. 

Don't listen to the voices telling you that you're not good enough or that you need to figure everything out right this very second. Take a deep breath, and take things one step at a time instead. Ask yourself, what is the most important thing for you to put your energy towards right now? How can that be achieved? 

With pen to paper, write down what it is that is currently causing you to feel uncertain. By writing out what is stressing you out, you're putting a name to the issue which can help you to tackle the problem and break it down into more manageable tasks for yourself. 

5. Know that you got this. 

Even though it may feel like your world is crashing down on you, remind yourself that this is just another hurdle for you on your journey to success. You've already gotten this far, and this isn't going to be what takes you down. 

By looking at the bigger picture, it can help put into perspective what is most important to you to achieve and prioritize. Keep pushing for the success that you want, and remind yourself that you are capable of any and everything that you set your mind to.

Published on: Sep 13, 2019
The opinions expressed here by Inc.com columnists are their own, not those of Inc.com.