If you're a good salesperson working for commission, you'll survive. But if you're one of the best, you'll become rich. Successful salespeople not only make more money, but they're also treated much better by their companies and CEOs who recognize their immense value.

I've met some of the richest salespeople across a wide variety of industries, and they all have a few key habits in common. Learn the 5 surprising things the richest salespeople do in every industry, so you can start to dominate your competition:

1. They prioritize quality over quantity.

Most people seem to think that rich salespeople simply know how to close more sales, but that couldn't be further from the truth. Top sales performers across industries focus on quality-- not quantity. In other words, they aren't closing a ton of small or average size sales. Instead, they're selling to massive companies.

Massive sales often require the same sales process and a similar amount of work as small ones, but the payout on an individual sale is significantly bigger. If you want to become a rich salesperson, think less about how many sales you're closing and more about who it is you're selling to.

2. They only sell to the top.

Here's another quality the richest salespeople all have in common: They only sell to VPs, CEOs, and other high-level prospects. They understand that a low-level prospect doesn't have the power to make a decision-- or the budget to back it up-- so they don't waste their time on dead-end meetings.

Look at it this way, successful salespeople have an hourly rate that averages out to hundreds of dollars per hour. By spending time on a mid-level manager without decision-making power, they're only losing money. If you want to climb to the top of your industry, you have to stop wasting time on non-decision makers.

3. If it doesn't make them money, they don't do it.

You complete two types of tasks every day: those that make you money and those that don't. Filling orders, completing paperwork, and handling customer service doesn't make you any richer. Prospecting, setting sales meetings, and attending key customer meetings absolutely will.

Successful salespeople focus on the tasks that make them more money, and then they outsource everything else. While it may cost you money to outsource those tasks, you'll still make far more money in the long run by focusing your time and energy solely on tasks that help you close more sales.

4. They understand the difference between outcomes and to-dos.

What goals would you like to achieve this year? Those are your outcomes. What tasks do you have planned for today? Those are your to-dos. Now take a closer look at your to-do list. If you're like most salespeople, many of your tasks won't get you any closer to accomplishing those important outcomes.

Rich salespeople understand this, and they always focus on outcomes over to-dos. Instead of letting little things distract them from their goals, they prioritize their responsibilities by what matters most. Practice this strategy, and you'll soon find yourself closing far more sales.

5. They leverage every sale into more sales.

Rich salespeople don't just pour champagne and pat themselves on the back when they close a massive sale. Instead, they leverage every opportunity to turn one sale into another one. In other words, successful salespeople rely heavily on existing relationships to be introduced to their next prospect.

Many high-level prospects are personally or professionally connected to one another, especially within the same industry. Any time you close a sale, don't miss the opportunity to ask for an introduction to someone else who could benefit from your product or service. This is key to meeting more valuable prospects and closing those big sales.

Which of these habits surprised you the most? How will you adjust your approach to think more like a rich salesperson? Share your thoughts in the comments below.

Published on: Aug 14, 2017
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