Do you ever feel uncertain about the direction of your business, or some part of your business? Likewise, do you experience uncertainty about what brings you joy or how you can achieve the ever-illusive life balance? You can mull questioning thoughts over and over in your mind, but oftentimes the clarity you desire just isn't there.

In her Critical Path Success'„¢ Program, marketing expert, Adriane Berg asks the questions: "Where Am I Now?" and "Where Do I Want to Be?" At first glace you might think that you can process these questions internally and figure it out eventually, but they offer a wonderful opportunity to mindmap your thoughts, obstacles, and solutions on paper.

Similarly, Byron Katie, author of The Work and numerous self-help books, offers "the questions and turn around," 4 key points to access when you are under stress or influenced by limiting beliefs:

- Is it true?
- Can you absolutely know that it's true?
- How do you react, what happens, when you believe that thought?
- Who would you be without the thought?

Clearing your mind and allowing the information to flow freely, without editing your thoughts, will lead to the solution more quickly. Mindmapping or journaling without judging or criticizing your thought process allows whole mind thinking, the use of the right and left-brain, so that both logical and creative thoughts can be a part of your process. Allowing the brain to operate in this manner will create an opening for insightful, new ideas and solutions. These AhHa moments can solve simple and complex problems alike and you may be surprised at the discoveries you are able to achieve by processing seemingly simple questions like the ones Katie and Berg suggest.

As busy entrepreneurs we often forget to set aside time for simple processes that can lead to big discoveries. I strongly recommend that time for intuitive processing becomes a part of every entrepreneur's schedule. Give it a try and let us know where it takes you. It's all a part of building your Million-Dollar Mindset!

Published on: May 26, 2009
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