Sometimes, when we think of leaving our comfort zones--whether metaphorically or physically--we make up a million reasons why it's just not feasible. We'll blame it on the fact that we don't have enough money, or we don't have enough time, or we never had any real interest in the activity anyway. One of the most challenging ways to leave your comfort zone, without a doubt, is traveling.

When we travel, we leave behind all we know--whether it's culture, food, or language. We throw ourselves into a foreign environment, force ourselves to adapt, and surprise ourselves with our ability to do so along the way.

1. It's good to take a break

Complacency creeps up on us when we spend too much time in our day-to-day routines. Travel is the perfect way to combat it. It's a breath of fresh air, a break from the mundaneness of everyday life. It is an escape that feels more real than fantastical--allowing us to access different parts of ourselves than we normally do. In addition, fracturing familiar routines has a way of encouraging us to grow more creative. Taking a break, it seems, is the easiest way to remember how to dream.

2. Sometimes, we need to be uncomfortable

Being challenged is how we grow. This long-standing saying has been proved true time and time again, practically without fail. Being in places where we don't know how to act forces us to confront things within ourselves we are not comfortable with, subsequently creating internal change in the midst of external dynamism--something that isn't easy to keep up with. By learning how to deal with such turmoil, we can only come out stronger than we began.

3. You forget how much fun you can have

Immersing yourself in a different life--not just a different time and place--forces you to breathe in a way that nothing else does. You make different friends, rediscover parts of yourself that got lost in work, and remember how to laugh until you sides burn. You learn how to let go while holding onto things that matter. What could be better than that?

Published on: Jun 30, 2016
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